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Perceived Ambiguity and Relevant Measures

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  • Sujoy Mukerji
  • Peter Klibanoff
  • Kyoungwon Seo

Abstract

We axiomatize preferences that can be represented by a monotonic aggregation of subjective expected utilities generated by a utility function and some set of i.i.d. probability measures over a product state space, S1. For such preferences, we define relevant measures, show that they are treated as if they were the only marginals possibly governing the state space and connect them with the measures appearing in the aforementioned representation. These results allow us to interpret relevant measures as reflecting part of perceived ambiguity, meaning subjective uncertainty about probabilities over states. Under mild conditions, we show that increases or decreases in ambiguity aversion cannot affect the relevant measures. This property, necessary for the conclusion that these measures reflect only perceived ambiguity, distinguishes the set of relevant measures from the leading alternative in the literature. We apply our findings to a number of well-known models of ambiguity-sensitive preferences. For each model, we identify the set of relevant measures and the implications of comparative ambiguity aversion.

Suggested Citation

  • Sujoy Mukerji & Peter Klibanoff & Kyoungwon Seo, 2014. "Perceived Ambiguity and Relevant Measures," Economics Series Working Papers 711, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:oxf:wpaper:711
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    File URL: http://www.economics.ox.ac.uk/materials/papers/13362/paper711.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Epstein, Larry G. & Halevy, Yoram, 2017. "Ambiguous Correlation," Microeconomics.ca working papers yoram_halevy-2017-2, Vancouver School of Economics, revised 09 Jan 2018.
    2. Jewitt, Ian & Mukerji, Sujoy, 2017. "Ordering ambiguous acts," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 171(C), pages 213-267.
    3. repec:eee:gamebe:v:111:y:2018:i:c:p:241-249 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Eric Danan & Thibault Gajdos & Brian Hill & Jean-Marc Tallon, 2016. "Robust Social Decisions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 106(9), pages 2407-2425, September.
    5. Epstein, Larry G. & Seo, Kyoungwon, 2015. "Exchangeable capacities, parameters and incomplete theories," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 157(C), pages 879-917.
    6. Roee Teper, 2016. "Who is a Bayesian?," Working Paper 5861, Department of Economics, University of Pittsburgh.
    7. Patrick Schmidt, 2019. "Elicitation of ambiguous beliefs with mixing bets," Papers 1902.07447, arXiv.org, revised Oct 2019.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Symmetry; beliefs; ambiguity; ambiguity aversion; sets of probabilities;

    JEL classification:

    • D01 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Microeconomic Behavior: Underlying Principles
    • D80 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - General
    • D81 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Criteria for Decision-Making under Risk and Uncertainty
    • D83 - Microeconomics - - Information, Knowledge, and Uncertainty - - - Search; Learning; Information and Knowledge; Communication; Belief; Unawareness

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