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World War II, the Baby Boom and Employment: County Level Evidence

Author

Listed:
  • Abel Brodeur

    (University of Ottawa and IZA)

  • Lamis Kattan

    (Department of Economics, University of Ottawa)

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of male casualties due to World War II on fertility and female employment in the United States. We rely on the number of casualties at the county-level and use a difference-in-differences strategy. While most counties in the U.S. experienced a Baby Boom following the war, we find that the increase in fertility was lower in high-casualty rate counties than in low-casualty rate counties. Analyzing the channels through which male casualties could have decreased fertility, we provide evidence that county male casualties are positively related to 1950s female employment and household income.

Suggested Citation

  • Abel Brodeur & Lamis Kattan, 2021. "World War II, the Baby Boom and Employment: County Level Evidence," Working Papers 2105E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:ott:wpaper:2105e
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10393/42201
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Baby Boom; Fertility; Female Labor Supply; World War II.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J11 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Demographic Trends, Macroeconomic Effects, and Forecasts
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • N3 - Economic History - - Labor and Consumers, Demography, Education, Health, Welfare, Income, Wealth, Religion, and Philanthropy
    • N4 - Economic History - - Government, War, Law, International Relations, and Regulation

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