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Expropriation of Foreign Direct Investments: Sectoral Patterns from 1993 to 2006

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  • Chris Hajzler

    () (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

Abstract

This paper documents expropriation of foreign direct investment (FDI) across all developing coun- tries for the 1993-2006 period, extending work by Kobrin (1980, 1984) and Minor (1994). This unique data set on worldwide expropriation between 1960 and 2006 is used to highlight several (interrelated) stylized facts. First, although expropriations have become less frequent compared to the 1970s, the number of takings has risen since the mid-1990s. Second, foreign firms are more vulnerable to expro- priation in resource-based sectors, particularly in mining and petroleum. Third, the timing of expro- priation coincides with fluctuations in mineral output price levels. Finally, when newly constructed FDI stock estimates are used to compare the sectoral distribution of FDI of recent expropriating coun- tries to that of non-expropriating countries, we find that expropriating countries have a higher average share of aggregate FDI located in resources; however, this difference is not reflected in average sector production shares. This last fact is puzzling given that natural resource-based FDI has traditionally been considered high risk.

Suggested Citation

  • Chris Hajzler, 2010. "Expropriation of Foreign Direct Investments: Sectoral Patterns from 1993 to 2006," Working Papers 1011, University of Otago, Department of Economics, revised Sep 2010.
  • Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:1011
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    File URL: http://www.otago.ac.nz/economics/research/otago077137.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Cannizzaro, Anthony P. & Weiner, Robert J., 2015. "Multinational investment and voluntary disclosure: Project-level evidence from the petroleum industry," Accounting, Organizations and Society, Elsevier, vol. 42(C), pages 32-47.
    2. repec:oup:jecgeo:v:18:y:2018:i:1:p:59-86. is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Kashcheeva, Mila, 2013. "Political limits on the world oil trade : firm-level evidence from US firms," IDE Discussion Papers 401, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    4. Horn, Henrik & Tangerås, Thomas, 2016. "Economics and Politics of International Investment Agreements," Working Paper Series 1140, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    5. Akhtaruzzaman, M. & Berg, Nathan & Hajzler, Christopher, 2017. "Expropriation risk and FDI in developing countries: Does return of capital dominate return on capital?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 49(C), pages 84-107.
    6. Niko Jaakkola & Daniel Spiro, 2016. "Finders, Keepers?," Working Papers id:11118, eSocialSciences.
    7. Li, Chen, 2016. "Signing a Bilateral Investment Treaty - A tradeoff between investment protection and regulation," Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145505, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    8. Hajzler, Christopher, 2014. "Resource-based FDI and expropriation in developing economies," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 92(1), pages 124-146.
    9. Kashcheeva, Mila & Tsui, Kevin K., 2014. "Why do oil importers diversify their import sources politically? : evidence from U.S. firm-level data," IDE Discussion Papers 458, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan External Trade Organization(JETRO).
    10. Liesbeth Colen & Damiaan Persyn & Andrea Guariso, 2014. "What type of FDI is attracted by bilateral investment treaties?," LICOS Discussion Papers 34614, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    11. Ramin Dadasov & Carsten Hefeker & Oliver Lorz, 2014. "Natural Resource Production, Corruption, and Expropriation," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201436, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    12. Christopher Hajzler & Jonathan Rosborough, 2016. "Government Corruption and Foreign Direct Investment Under the Threat of Expropriation," Staff Working Papers 16-13, Bank of Canada.
    13. Glen Biglaiser & Hoon Lee & Joseph L. Staats, 2016. "The effects of the IMF on expropriation of foreign firms," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 11(1), pages 1-23, March.
    14. Kashcheeva, Mila & Tsui, Kevin K., 2015. "Political oil import diversification by financial and commercial traders," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 82(C), pages 289-297.
    15. Colen, Liesbeth & Persyn, Damiaan & Guariso, Andrea, 2016. "Bilateral Investment Treaties and FDI: Does the Sector Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 193-206.
    16. repec:spr:weltar:v:153:y:2017:i:4:d:10.1007_s10290-017-0288-y is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Hanna Krings, 2014. "Environmental Aspects of Resource Extraction Contracts," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201434, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).
    18. Zoe Phillips Williams, 2016. "Investor-State Arbitration in Domestic Mining Conflicts," Global Environmental Politics, MIT Press, vol. 16(4), pages 32-49, November.
    19. repec:bla:jscmgt:v:53:y:2017:i:4:p:3-12 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Baldursson, Fridrik Mar & von der Fehr, Nils-Henrik, 2015. "Natural Resources and Sovereign Expropriation," Memorandum 05/2015, Oslo University, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Expropriation; Foreign Direct Investment; Natural Resources;

    JEL classification:

    • F23 - International Economics - - International Factor Movements and International Business - - - Multinational Firms; International Business
    • F43 - International Economics - - Macroeconomic Aspects of International Trade and Finance - - - Economic Growth of Open Economies
    • F51 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - International Conflicts; Negotiations; Sanctions
    • F59 - International Economics - - International Relations, National Security, and International Political Economy - - - Other

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