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Monopsonistic Discrimination and the Gender-Wage Gap

  • Erling Barth
  • Harald Dale-Olsen

Models of worker flows have revitalized the idea of monopsony in the labor market. We apply such a model to gender differences. We argue that monopsonistic discrimination may be a substantial factor behind the overall gender wage gap, in particular with respect to differences arising between occupations and establishments. Using matched employer-employee data from Norway, we investigate the wage structure within and between establishments, and present novel evidence that the establishments' excess turnover of employees is sensitive to the wage premium of men, but not to the wage premium of women. Furthermore, we show that male turnover is more wage-elastic than female turnover.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w7197.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 7197.

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Date of creation: Jun 1999
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Publication status: published as Barth, Erling & Dale-Olsen, Harald, 2009. "Monopsonistic discrimination, worker turnover, and the gender wage gap," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(5), pages 589-597, October.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:7197
Note: LS
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  17. Kenneth Burdett & Dale T. Mortensen, 1989. "Equilibrium Wage Differentials and Employer Size," Discussion Papers 860, Northwestern University, Center for Mathematical Studies in Economics and Management Science.
  18. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1990. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Job Ladders," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages S106-23, January.
  19. Kristen Keith & Abagail McWilliams, 1999. "The Returns to mobility and job search by gender," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 52(3), pages 460-477, April.
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