IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/p/nbr/nberwo/23281.html
   My bibliography  Save this paper

Monetary Policy, Bounded Rationality, and Incomplete Markets

Author

Listed:
  • Emmanuel Farhi
  • Iván Werning

Abstract

This paper extends the benchmark New-Keynesian model with a representative agent and rational expectations by introducing two key frictions: (1) agent heterogeneity with incomplete markets, uninsurable idiosyncratic risk, and occasionally-binding borrowing constraints; and (2) bounded rationality in the form of level-k thinking. Compared to the benchmark model, we show that the interaction of these two frictions leads to a powerful mitigation of the effects of monetary policy, which is much more pronounced at long horizons, and offers a potential rationalization of the “forward guidance puzzle”. Each of these frictions, in isolation, would lead to no or much smaller departures from the benchmark model. We conclude that the interaction of bounded rationality and market frictions improves the ability of the model to account for the effects of monetary policy.

Suggested Citation

  • Emmanuel Farhi & Iván Werning, 2017. "Monetary Policy, Bounded Rationality, and Incomplete Markets," NBER Working Papers 23281, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23281
    Note: EFG ME
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w23281.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Oh, Hyunseung & Reis, Ricardo, 2012. "Targeted transfers and the fiscal response to the great recession," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(S), pages 50-64.
    2. Greg Kaplan & Giovanni L. Violante, 2014. "A Model of the Consumption Response to Fiscal Stimulus Payments," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 82(4), pages 1199-1239, July.
    3. Blanchard, Olivier J, 1985. "Debt, Deficits, and Finite Horizons," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 93(2), pages 223-247, April.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. repec:nbr:nberch:14079 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Mark Gertler, 2017. "Rethinking the Power of Forward Guidance: Lessons from Japan," IMES Discussion Paper Series 17-E-08, Institute for Monetary and Economic Studies, Bank of Japan.
    3. repec:aea:jecper:v:32:y:2018:i:3:p:113-40 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Camille Cornand & Frank Heinemann, 2018. "Experiments on macroeconomics: methods and applications," Post-Print halshs-01809937, HAL.
    5. P. Andrade & G. Gaballo & E. Mengus & B. Mojon, 2015. "Forward Guidance and Heterogeneous Beliefs," Working papers 573, Banque de France.
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Martin S. Eichenbaum & Mathias Trabandt, 2018. "On DSGE Models," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 32(3), pages 113-140, Summer.
    7. Lawrence J. Christiano, 2017. "Comment on "Michelson-Morley, Fisher, and Occam: The Radical Implications of Stable Quiet Inflation at the Zero Bound"," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 2017, volume 32, pages 227-245 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. repec:aea:jecper:v:32:y:2018:i:3:p:87-112 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Gerke, Rafael & Giesen, Sebastian & Kienzler, Daniel & Tenhofen, Jörn, 2017. "Interest-rate pegs, central bank asset purchases and the reversal puzzle," Discussion Papers 21/2017, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    10. George-Marios Angeletos & Zhen Huo, 2018. "Myopia and Anchoring," NBER Working Papers 24545, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Massenot, Baptiste, 2018. "A business cycle model with neuroeconomic foundations," SAFE Working Paper Series 194, Research Center SAFE - Sustainable Architecture for Finance in Europe, Goethe University Frankfurt.
    12. George-Marios Angeletos, 2017. "Frictional Coordination," NBER Working Papers 24178, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Xavier Gabaix, 2017. "Behavioral Inattention," NBER Working Papers 24096, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Camille Cornand & Frank Heinemann, 2018. "Experiments on macroeconomics: methods and applications," Working Papers 1810, Groupe d'Analyse et de Théorie Economique Lyon St-Étienne (GATE Lyon St-Étienne), Université de Lyon.
    15. George-Marios Angeletos & Chen Lian, 2017. "Dampening General Equilibrium: From Micro to Macro," NBER Working Papers 23379, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E03 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General - - - Behavioral Macroeconomics
    • E1 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - General Aggregative Models
    • E4 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

    NEP fields

    This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23281. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/nberrus.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.