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Fiscal Multipliers: Liquidity Traps and Currency Unions

  • Emmanuel Farhi
  • Iván Werning

We provide explicit solutions for government spending multipliers during a liquidity trap and within a fixed exchange regime using standard closed and open-economy models. We confirm the potential for large multipliers during liquidity traps. For a currency union, we show that self-financed multipliers are small, always below unity. However, outside transfers or windfalls can generate larger responses in out- put, whether or not they are spent by the government. Our solutions are relevant for local and national multipliers, providing insight into the economic mechanisms at work as well as the testable implications of these models.

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File URL: http://www.nber.org/papers/w18381.pdf
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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 18381.

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Date of creation: Sep 2012
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:18381
Note: EFG IFM ME
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  1. Jordi Galí & Tommaso Monacelli, 2003. "Monetary Policy and Exchange Rate Volatility in a Small Open Economy," Working Papers 11, Barcelona Graduate School of Economics.
  2. Christopher J. Erceg & Jesper Linde, 2012. "Fiscal Consolidation in an Open Economy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 186-91, May.
  3. Corsetti, Giancarlo & Kuester, Keith & Müller, Gernot, 2011. "Floats, pegs and the transmission of fiscal policy," CEPR Discussion Papers 8180, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. Jeffrey Clemens & Stephen Miran, 2012. "Fiscal Policy Multipliers on Subnational Government Spending," American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, American Economic Association, vol. 4(2), pages 46-68, May.
  5. Antonio Acconcia & Giancarlo Corsetti & Saverio Simonelli, 2011. "Mafia and Public Spending: Evidence on the Fiscal Multiplier from a Quasi-experiment," CSEF Working Papers 281, Centre for Studies in Economics and Finance (CSEF), University of Naples, Italy, revised 04 Feb 2013.
  6. Alan J. Auerbach & Yuriy Gorodnichenko, 2011. "Fiscal Multipliers in Recession and Expansion," NBER Working Papers 17447, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Lauren Cohen & Joshua D. Coval & Christopher Malloy, 2010. "Do Powerful Politicians Cause Corporate Downsizing?," NBER Working Papers 15839, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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