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Aftershocks of Monetary Unification: Hysteresis with a Financial Twist

Listed author(s):
  • Tamim Bayoumi
  • Barry Eichengreen

Once upon a time, in the 1990s, it was widely agreed that neither Europe nor the United States was an optimum currency area, although moderating this concern was the finding that it was possible to distinguish a regional core and periphery (Bayoumi and Eichengreen, 1993). Revisiting these issues, we find that the United States is remains closer to an optimum currency area than the Euro Area. More intriguingly, the Euro Area shows striking changes in correlations and responses which we interpret as reflecting hysteresis with a financial twist, in which the financial system causes aggregate supply and demand shocks to reinforce each other. An implication is that if the Euro Area wishes to avoid financial booms and busts it will need vigorous, coordinated regulation of its banking and financial systems by a single supervisor—that monetary union without banking union will be prone to economic and financial instability.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 23205.

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Date of creation: Feb 2017
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:23205
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  1. Lawless, Martina & Babecký, Jan & Du Caju, Philip & Kosma, Theodora & Messina, Julián & Rõõm, Tairi, 2009. "Downward Nominal and Real Wage Rigidity:Survey Evidence from European Firms," Research Technical Papers 11/RT/09, Central Bank of Ireland.
  2. Olivier Blanchard & Eugenio Cerutti & Lawrence H. Summers, 2015. "Inflation and Activity: Two Explorations and Their Monetary Policy Implications," Working Paper Series WP15-19, Peterson Institute for International Economics.
  3. Olivier J Blanchard & Eugenio M Cerutti & Lawrence Summers, 2015. "Inflation and Activity – Two Explorations and their Monetary Policy Implications," IMF Working Papers 15/230, .
  4. Campos, Nauro F. & Macchiarelli, Corrado, 2016. "Core and Periphery in the European Monetary Union: Bayoumi and Eichengreen 25 years later," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 147(C), pages 127-130.
  5. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis and the European Unemployment Problem," NBER Working Papers 1950, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Kemmerling, Achim & Bruttel, Oliver, 2005. "New politics in German labour market policy? The implications of the recent Hartz reforms for the German welfare state," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment SP I 2005-101, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
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