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Cliometrics and the Nobel


  • Claudia Goldin


In October 1993, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences awarded the Nobel Prize in Economics to Robert William Fogel and Douglass Cecil North `for having renewed research in economic history.' The Academy noted that `they were pioneers in the branch of economic history that has been called the þnew economic history,þ or þcliometricsþ.' In this paper I address what this cliometrics is and how these two Nobel Prize winners furthered the discipline of economics.

Suggested Citation

  • Claudia Goldin, 1994. "Cliometrics and the Nobel," NBER Historical Working Papers 0065, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberhi:0065 Note: DAE

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Harley, C. Knick, 1988. "Ocean Freight Rates and Productivity, 1740–1913: The Primacy of Mechanical Invention Reaffirmed," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 48(04), pages 851-876, December.
    2. McCloskey, Donald N, 1976. "Does the Past Have Useful Economics?," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 14(2), pages 434-461, June.
    3. Wright, Gavin, 1979. "The Efficiency of Slavery: Another Interpretation," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 69(1), pages 219-226, March.
    4. Murphy, Kevin M & Shleifer, Andrei & Vishny, Robert W, 1989. "Industrialization and the Big Push," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 97(5), pages 1003-1026, October.
    5. The Conference on Research in Income and Wealth, 1960. "Trends in the American Economy in the Nineteenth Century," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number unkn60-1, January.
    6. Fogel, Robert W & Engerman, Stanley L, 1980. "Explaining the Relative Efficiency of Slave Agriculture in the Antebellum South: Reply," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 70(4), pages 672-690, September.
    7. Robert W. Fogel, 1986. "Nutrition and the Decline in Mortality since 1700: Some Preliminary Findings," NBER Chapters,in: Long-Term Factors in American Economic Growth, pages 439-556 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Douglass C. North, 1968. "Sources of Productivity Change in Ocean Shipping, 1600-1850," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76, pages 953-953.
    9. Fogel, Robert W & Engerman, Stanley L, 1977. "Explaining the Relative Efficiency of Slave Agriculture in the Antebellum South," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 67(3), pages 275-296, June.
    10. Whaples, Robert, 1991. "A Quantitative History of the Journal of Economc History and the Cliometric Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(02), pages 289-301, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Azomahou, Théophile & Diebolt, Claude & Mishra, Tapas, 2009. "Spatial persistence of demographic shocks and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 98-127, March.
    2. White, Eugene N., 1996. "The past and future of economic history in economics," The Quarterly Review of Economics and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 36(Supplemen), pages 61-72.
    3. Claude Diebolt & Tapas K. Mishra, 2006. "Cliometrics of the Abiding Nexus Between Demographic Components and Economic Development," Working Papers 06-06, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    4. David Mitch, 2010. "Chicago and Economic History," Chapters,in: The Elgar Companion to the Chicago School of Economics, chapter 8 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    5. Tapas Mishra & Claude Diebolt, 2010. "Demographic volatility and economic growth: convention and beyond," Quality & Quantity: International Journal of Methodology, Springer, vol. 44(1), pages 25-45, January.
    6. repec:ksa:szemle:1751 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Claude Diebolt, 2015. "Comment appréhender les temporalités de l’histoire économique ? Plaidoyer pour une cliométrie des évènements rares," Working Papers 01-15, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    8. Lehmann-Waffenschmidt, Marco, 2001. "Kontingenz und Kausalität bei evolutorischen Prozessen," Dresden Discussion Paper Series in Economics 12/01, Technische Universität Dresden, Faculty of Business and Economics, Department of Economics.
    9. Claude Diebolt & Faustine Perrin, 2014. "The Foundations of Female Empowerment Revisited," Revue d'économie politique, Dalloz, vol. 124(4), pages 587-597.
    10. Adolfo Meisel-Roca. & Margarita Vega A., 2006. "Los Origenes De La Antropometria Histórica Y Su Estado Actual," Cuadernos de Historia Económica 18, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
    11. repec:eee:soceco:v:69:y:2017:i:c:p:117-124 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Samman, Amin, 2011. "History in finance and fiction in history: The crisis of 2008 and the return of the past," economic sociology_the european electronic newsletter, Max Planck Institute for the Study of Societies, vol. 12(3), pages 26-34.
    13. Bruno S. Frey & Marcel Kucher, 1999. "Wars and Markets: How Bond Values Reflect World War II," CESifo Working Paper Series 221, CESifo Group Munich.
    14. Claude Diebolt & Catherine Kyrtsou, 2006. "Non-Linear Perspectives for Population and Output Dynamics: New Evidence for Cliometrics," Working Papers 06-02, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC).
    15. Luděk Kouba, 2009. "Návrh klasifikace soudobých sociálně-ekonomických přístupů k teorii růstu
      [The Proposal of Original Classification of Contemporary Social-Economic Approaches to the Growth Theory]
      ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(5), pages 696-713.

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    JEL classification:

    • N0 - Economic History - - General


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