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Návrh klasifikace soudobých sociálně-ekonomických přístupů k teorii růstu
[The Proposal of Original Classification of Contemporary Social-Economic Approaches to the Growth Theory]

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  • Luděk Kouba

Abstract

The paper works with assumptions, that the conclusions of mainstream approaches to the growth theory are problematical; there are alternative social-economic approaches to the theory of economic growth that offer more plausible explanations of the fundamental economic questions than the traditional views; both social-economic lines of thought and social-economic approaches to the growth theory are not systematized. Considering of these matters, the main aim of this paper is to propose original classification of contemporary social-economic approaches to the growth theory and consecutively to characterize these classified approaches. Two partial streams within the social-economic approaches to the growth theory based on formal conception of institutions (the approach primarily emphasizing the importance of political institutions, the approach primarily emphasizing the importance of economic institutions) have many common features (subjects, methodology, conclusions, exponents) and they together make prevailing stream of the contemporary social-economic growth theory. The growth theory of the new institutional economics based on the North´s path dependency concept is still less profiled. This approach really accepts the conception of institutions of Douglas North.

Suggested Citation

  • Luděk Kouba, 2009. "Návrh klasifikace soudobých sociálně-ekonomických přístupů k teorii růstu
    [The Proposal of Original Classification of Contemporary Social-Economic Approaches to the Growth Theory]
    ," Politická ekonomie, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2009(5), pages 696-713.
  • Handle: RePEc:prg:jnlpol:v:2009:y:2009:i:5:id:705:p:696-713
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    Cited by:

    1. Dana Kovanicová, 2010. "The Reasons for the Adoption of IFRS: Economic or Institutional?," Český finanční a účetní časopis, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2010(4), pages 90-95.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic growth; path dependency; Classification of growth theory; formal institutions; informal institutions;

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General
    • O43 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Institutions and Growth
    • P14 - Economic Systems - - Capitalist Systems - - - Property Rights

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