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A Cliometric Counterfactual: What if There Had Been Neither Fogel nor North?

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  • Claude Diebolt
  • Michael Haupert

Abstract

1993 Nobel laureates Robert Fogel and Douglass North were pioneers in the “new” economic history, or cliometrics. Their impact on the economic history discipline is great, though not without its critics. In this essay, we use both the “old” narrative form of economic history, and the “new” cliometric form, to analyze the impact each had on the evolution of economic history.

Suggested Citation

  • Claude Diebolt & Michael Haupert, 2017. "A Cliometric Counterfactual: What if There Had Been Neither Fogel nor North?," Working Papers of BETA 2017-04, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
  • Handle: RePEc:ulp:sbbeta:2017-04
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    File URL: http://www.beta-umr7522.fr/productions/publications/2017/2017-04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Davis, Lance E. & Hughes, Jonathan R. T. & Reiter, Stanley, 1960. "Aspects of Quantitative Research in Economic History," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(04), pages 539-547, December.
    2. Fogel, Robert William, 2000. "The Fourth Great Awakening and the Future of Egalitarianism," University of Chicago Press Economics Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226256627.
    3. Claude Diebolt, 2012. "The cliometric voice," History of Economic Ideas, Fabrizio Serra Editore, Pisa - Roma, vol. 20(3), pages 51-64.
    4. Basu, Kaushik & Jones, Eric & Schlicht, Ekkehart, 1987. "The growth and decay of custom: The role of the new institutional economics in economic history," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 24(1), pages 1-21, January.
    5. repec:hrv:faseco:30703876 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Ann M. Carlos, 2010. "Reflection on reflections: review essay on reflections on the cliometric revolution: conversations with economic historians," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 4(1), pages 97-111, January.
    7. Claudia Goldin, 1995. "Cliometrics and the Nobel," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(2), pages 191-208, Spring.
    8. Claude Diebolt, 2016. "Cliometrica after 10 years: definition and principles of cliometric research," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 10(1), pages 1-4, January.
    9. McAfee, R Preston, 1983. "American Economic Growth and the Voyage of Columbus," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 73(4), pages 735-740, September.
    10. Whaples, Robert, 1995. "Where Is There Consensus Among American Economic Historians? The Results of a Survey on Forty Propositions," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 55(01), pages 139-154, March.
    11. Douglass C. North, 1968. "Sources of Productivity Change in Ocean Shipping, 1600-1850," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 76, pages 953-953.
    12. McCloskey, Donald N., 1978. "The Achievements of the Cliometric School," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 38(01), pages 13-28, March.
    13. Fogel, Robert William, 1962. "A Quantitative Approach to the Study of Railroads in American Economic Growth: A Report of Some Preliminary Findings," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 22(02), pages 163-197, June.
    14. Redlich, Fritz, 1965. "“New” and Traditional Approaches to Economic History and Their Interdependence," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 25(04), pages 480-495, December.
    15. Whaples, Robert, 1991. "A Quantitative History of the Journal of Economc History and the Cliometric Revolution," The Journal of Economic History, Cambridge University Press, vol. 51(02), pages 289-301, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Lino Wehrheim, 2017. "Economic History Goes Digital: Topic Modeling the Journal of Economic History," Working Papers 177, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    2. repec:spr:cliomt:v:12:y:2018:i:3:d:10.1007_s11698-017-0168-7 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cliometrics; Economic History; Methodology; Economics; History.;

    JEL classification:

    • A12 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Relation of Economics to Other Disciplines
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C18 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Methodolical Issues: General
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General
    • N01 - Economic History - - General - - - Development of the Discipline: Historiographical; Sources and Methods

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    1. Cliometrics in Wikipedia English ne '')
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