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Which is the best model for the US inflation rate : a structural changes model or a long memory




This paper analyzes the dynamics of the US inflation series using two classes of models : structural changes models and Long memory processes. For the first class, we use the Markov Switching (MS-AR) model of Hamilton (1989) and the Structural Change (SCH-AR) model using the sequential method proposed by Bai and Perron (1998, 2003). For the second class, we use the ARFIMA process developed by Granger and Joyeux (1980). Moreover, we investigate whether the observed long memory behavior is a true behavior or a spurious behavior created by the presence of breaks in time series. Our empirical results provide evidence for changes in mean, breaks dates coincide exactly with some economic and financial events such Vietnam War and the two oil price shocks. Moreover, we show that the observed long memory behavior is spurious and is due to the presence of breaks in data set.

Suggested Citation

  • Lanouar Charfeddine & Dominique Guégan, 2007. "Which is the best model for the US inflation rate : a structural changes model or a long memory," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne b07061, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
  • Handle: RePEc:mse:cesdoc:b07061

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Bonnisseau, Jean-Marc & Lachiri, Oussama, 2004. "On the objective of firms under uncertainty with stock markets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(5), pages 493-513, August.
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    3. Bisin, Alberto, 1998. "General Equilibrium with Endogenously Incomplete Financial Markets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 82(1), pages 19-45, September.
    4. Dreze, Jacques H, 1985. "(Uncertainty and) the Firm in General Equilibrium Theory," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 95(380a), pages 1-20, Supplemen.
    5. Magill, Michael & Shafer, Wayne, 1991. "Incomplete markets," Handbook of Mathematical Economics,in: W. Hildenbrand & H. Sonnenschein (ed.), Handbook of Mathematical Economics, edition 1, volume 4, chapter 30, pages 1523-1614 Elsevier.
    6. Oussama Lachiri & Jean-Marc Bonnisseau, 2004. "Dreze's Criterion In A Multi-Period Economy With Stock Markets," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 88, Royal Economic Society.
    7. Geanakoplos, John, 1990. "An introduction to general equilibrium with incomplete asset markets," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 1-38.
    8. Radner, Roy, 1972. "Existence of Equilibrium of Plans, Prices, and Price Expectations in a Sequence of Markets," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 40(2), pages 289-303, March.
    9. Geanakoplos, J. & Magill, M. & Quinzii, M. & Dreze, J., 1990. "Generic inefficiency of stock market equilibrium when markets are incomplete," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 113-151.
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    Cited by:

    1. Dominique Guegan & Philippe de Peretti, 2011. "Tests of Structural Changes in Conditional Distributions with Unknown Changepoints," Documents de travail du Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne 11042, Université Panthéon-Sorbonne (Paris 1), Centre d'Economie de la Sorbonne.
    2. Dominique Guégan & Philippe Peretti, 2013. "An omnibus test to detect time-heterogeneity in time series," Computational Statistics, Springer, vol. 28(3), pages 1225-1239, June.
    3. Peter Smith, 2010. "Discussion of the Fisher Effect Puzzle: A Case of Non-Linear Relationship," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 21(1), pages 105-108, February.

    More about this item


    Structural breaks models; long range dependance; inflation series.;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • C32 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Time-Series Models; Dynamic Quantile Regressions; Dynamic Treatment Effect Models; Diffusion Processes; State Space Models
    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles

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