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Human Accomplishment and Growth in Britain since 1270: The Role of Great Scientists and Education

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  • Jakob Brochner Madsen

Abstract

This paper constructs annual data on primary, secondary and tertiary education, significant inventions and great scientists in the period 1270-2011 for Britain to investigate the influence of education and science on the economic development of Britain. Institutions, culture, real book prices and other variables are used to trace the origin of innovations, great scientists and educational attainment. The regressions show that education, a highly innovative environment and knowledge spillovers were influential in shaping British economic development over the period 1270-2011.

Suggested Citation

  • Jakob Brochner Madsen, 2016. "Human Accomplishment and Growth in Britain since 1270: The Role of Great Scientists and Education," Monash Economics Working Papers 01-16, Monash University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:mos:moswps:2016-01
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    Cited by:

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    2. Adrien Montalbo, 2022. "Primary education and economic growth in nineteenth-century France," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 16(2), pages 277-332, May.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economic growth; science; education; institutions; culture;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O30 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - General
    • O40 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - General

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