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Dimensions of illiteracy, 1750-1850

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  • Schofield, R. S.

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  • Schofield, R. S., 1973. "Dimensions of illiteracy, 1750-1850," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 10(4), pages 437-454.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:exehis:v:10:y:1973:i:4:p:437-454
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    Cited by:

    1. Sara Horrell & Deborah Oxley, 2015. "Gender discrimination in 19thc England: evidence from factory children," Economics Series Working Papers Number 133, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    2. Kevin H. O'Rourke & Ahmed S. Rahman & Alan M. Taylor, 2008. "Luddites and the Demographic Transition," NBER Working Papers 14484, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Baines, Dudley & Howlett, Peter & Johnson, Paul, 1992. "Human capital and payment systems in Britain, 1833-1914," Economic History Working Papers 22453, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    4. Horrell, Sara & Oxley, Deborah, 2016. "Gender bias in nineteenth-century England: Evidence from factory children," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 22(C), pages 47-64.
    5. Galor, Oded, 2005. "From Stagnation to Growth: Unified Growth Theory," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Philippe Aghion & Steven Durlauf (ed.), Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 4, pages 171-293 Elsevier.
    6. Begoña Álvarez & Fernando Ramos Palencia, 2016. "The role of human capital in pre-industrial societies: Skills and earnings in eighteenth-century Castile (Spain)," Working Papers 16.03, Universidad Pablo de Olavide, Department of Economics, Quantitative Methods and Economic History.
    7. Broadberry, Stephen & Campbell, Bruce M.S. & van Leeuwen, Bas, 2013. "When did Britain industrialise? The sectoral distribution of the labour force and labour productivity in Britain, 1381–1851," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 50(1), pages 16-27.
    8. Clark, Gregory, 2014. "The Industrial Revolution," Handbook of Economic Growth,in: Handbook of Economic Growth, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 5, pages 217-262 Elsevier.
    9. Pleijt, Alexandra M. de & Nuvolari, Alessandro & Weisdorf, Jacob, 2016. "Human Capital Formation during the First Industrial Revolution: Evidence from the Use of Steam Engines," CAGE Online Working Paper Series 294, Competitive Advantage in the Global Economy (CAGE).
    10. Sara Horrell & Deborah Oxley, 2015. "Gender discrimination in 19thc England: Evidence from factory children," Oxford University Economic and Social History Series _133, Economics Group, Nuffield College, University of Oxford.
    11. Broadberry Stephen, 2012. "Recent Developments in the Theory of Very Long Run Growth: A Historical Appraisal," Jahrbuch für Wirtschaftsgeschichte / Economic History Yearbook, De Gruyter, vol. 53(1), pages 277-306, May.
    12. Stokey, Nancy L., 2001. "A quantitative model of the British industrial revolution, 1780-1850," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 55(1), pages 55-109, December.
    13. Crafts, Nicholas, 1995. "The 'quality of life': lessons for and from the British Industrial Revolution," Economic History Working Papers 22418, London School of Economics and Political Science, Department of Economic History.
    14. Gregory Clark, 2005. "The Condition of the Working Class in England, 1209-2004," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 113(6), pages 1307-1340, December.
    15. Joel Mokyr & Hans-Joachim Voth, 2012. "Understanding Growth in Europe, 1700–1870: Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Sociology, National Research University Higher School of Economics, vol. 13(5), pages 57-102.
    16. Matteo Cervellati & Uwe Sunde, 2005. "Human Capital Formation, Life Expectancy, and the Process of Development," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1653-1672, December.
    17. Oded Galor, 2011. "Unified Growth Theory," Economics Books, Princeton University Press, edition 1, number 9477.
    18. Franziska Tollnek & Joerg Baten, 2012. "Farmer Families at the Heart of the Educational Revolution: Which Occupational Group Inherited Human Capital in the Early Modern Era?," Working Papers 0033, European Historical Economics Society (EHES).
    19. Becker, Sascha & Hornung, Erik & Woessmann, Ludger, 2009. "Catch Me If You Can: Education and Catch-up in the Industrial Revoluti on," Stirling Economics Discussion Papers 2009-19, University of Stirling, Division of Economics.
    20. Saviotti, Pier Paolo & Pyka, Andreas & Jun, Bogang, 2016. "Education, structural change and economic development," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 55-68.
    21. repec:eee:exehis:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:152-162 is not listed on IDEAS
    22. repec:eee:exehis:v:67:y:2018:i:c:p:105-133 is not listed on IDEAS
    23. repec:ebl:ecbull:eb-15-00420 is not listed on IDEAS
    24. Feldman, Naomi E. & van der Beek, Karine, 2016. "Skill choice and skill complementarity in eighteenth century England," Explorations in Economic History, Elsevier, vol. 59(C), pages 94-113.

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