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Return to Commuting Distance in Sweden

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  • Sergii TROSHCHENKOV

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Abstract

The aim of this paper is to estimate the magnitude of the economic return to commuting and compare the relative returns received by men and women. We apply fixed effect models to deal with individual unobserved heterogeneity that could potentially generate an endogeneity issue. We use a large dataset based on Administrative Registers for Sweden, which gathers detailed information on residential and job location, and indirectly on commuting. Results indicate that individuals receive relatively small compensations for commuting, with higher returns in agglomerations. Moreover, the relative return as a fraction of hourly wage is approximately similar across genders. This last finding provides evidence of similar bargaining powers for both men and women.

Suggested Citation

  • Sergii TROSHCHENKOV, 2016. "Return to Commuting Distance in Sweden," Departmental Working Papers 2016-08, Department of Economics, Management and Quantitative Methods at Università degli Studi di Milano.
  • Handle: RePEc:mil:wpdepa:2016-08
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    File URL: http://wp.demm.unimi.it/files/wp/2016/DEMM-2016_08wp.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Earnings; Commuting; Return to commuting; Labor Mobility; Gender equality;

    JEL classification:

    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R41 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - Transportation: Demand, Supply, and Congestion; Travel Time; Safety and Accidents; Transportation Noise

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