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Analyse de l’impact de la hausse mondiale des prix et des politiques de réponse du gouvernment sur la pauvreté

  • Damien Agobdji
  • Kokou Amouzouvi
  • Kname Bouare
  • Idrissa Diagne
  • Aristide Kielem
Registered author(s):

    Cette recherche analyse l’impact de la hausse des prix des produits alimentaires (2008-2009) et des mesures de réformes mises en oeuvre par le Togo, sur la pauvreté, la vulnérabilité, les inégalités et les enfants. Grâce à un modèle d’équilibre général partiel et des données de panel, nous montrons que la hausse des prix a des conséquences sur le bien-être des enfants, et des effets négatifs sur les consommateurs nets, tandis que les agriculteurs, producteurs nets voient leur niveau de vie s’améliorer. Cette recherche montre également que les politiques de réponse du gouvernement, en particulier celles relatives à la subvention des intrants agricoles, ont eu un impact positif sur la réduction de la pauvreté. Enfin, nous montrons que des programmes ciblés de filets sociaux auraient des effets plus importants sur la pauvreté et le bien-être des enfants que les mesures régressives et plus couteuses de subvention aux produits pétroliers mis en oeuvres par le Gouvernement.

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    File URL: http://portal.pep-net.org/documents/download/id/21086
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    Paper provided by PEP-PMMA in its series Working Papers PMMA with number 2013-10.

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    Date of creation: 2013
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    Handle: RePEc:lvl:pmmacr:2013-10
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