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The Impact of the World Food Price Crisis on Nutrition in China

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  • Jensen, Robert T.

    (U of California, Los Angeles)

  • Miller, Nolan

    (Harvard U)

Abstract

World food prices have increased dramatically in recent years. We use panel data from 2006 to examine the impact of these increases on the consumption and nutrition of poor households in two Chinese provinces. We find that households in Hunan suffered no nutrition declines. Households in Gansu experienced a small decline in calories, though the decline is on par with usual seasonal effects. The overall nutritional impact of the world price increase was small because households were able to substitute to cheaper foods and because the domestic prices of staple foods remained low due to government intervention in grain markets.

Suggested Citation

  • Jensen, Robert T. & Miller, Nolan, 2008. "The Impact of the World Food Price Crisis on Nutrition in China," Working Paper Series rwp08-039, Harvard University, John F. Kennedy School of Government.
  • Handle: RePEc:ecl:harjfk:rwp08-039
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    File URL: https://research.hks.harvard.edu/publications/workingpapers/citation.aspx?PubId=5833&type=WPN
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:aph:ajpbhl:2003:93:7:1149-1154_3 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics,in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
    3. Jed Friedman & James Levinsohn, 2002. "The Distributional Impacts of Indonesia's Financial Crisis on Household Welfare: A "Rapid Response" Methodology," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 16(3), pages 397-423, December.
    4. Robert T. Jensen & Nolan H. Miller, 2007. "Giffen Behavior: Theory and Evidence," NBER Working Papers 13243, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Bhattacharya, J. & DeLeire, T. & Haider, S. & Currie, J., 2003. "Heat or Eat? Cold-Weather Shocks and Nutrition in Poor American Families," American Journal of Public Health, American Public Health Association, vol. 93(7), pages 1149-1154.
    6. Jere R. Behrman & Anil B. Deolalikar, 1990. "The Intrahousehold Demand for Nutrients in Rural South India: Individual Estimates, Fixed Effects, and Permanent Income," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 25(4), pages 665-696.
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    Cited by:

    1. Sami Bibi & Massa Coulibaly & John Cockburn & Luca Tiberti, 2009. "L'impact de la hausse des prix des produits alimentaires sur la pauvreté des enfants et les reponses politiques au Mali," Papers inwopa09/60, Innocenti Working Papers.
    2. Emmanuel Skoufias & Vincenzo Di Maro & Teresa González-Cossío & Sonia Rodríguez Ramírez, 2009. "Nutrient consumption and household income in rural Mexico," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(6), pages 657-675, November.

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