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The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on the Matriculation of Junior High School Students into Rural China’s High Schools

Author

Listed:
  • Fan Li
  • Yingquan Song
  • Hongmei Yi
  • Jianguo Wei
  • Linxiu Zhang
  • Yaojiang Shi
  • James Chu
  • Natalie Johnson
  • Prashant Loyalka
  • Scott Rozelle

Abstract

The goal of this study is to examine whether promising a Conditional Cash Transfer (conditional on matriculation) at the start of junior high increases the rate at which disadvantaged students matriculate in to high school. Based on a randomized controlled trial involving 1,418 disadvantaged (economically poor) students in rural China, we find that the promise of a CCT has no effect on increasing high school matriculation for the average disadvantaged student. We do find, however, that providing the CCT increases high school matriculation among the subset of disadvantaged students who overestimate the direct costs of attending high school.

Suggested Citation

  • Fan Li & Yingquan Song & Hongmei Yi & Jianguo Wei & Linxiu Zhang & Yaojiang Shi & James Chu & Natalie Johnson & Prashant Loyalka & Scott Rozelle, 2015. "The Impact of Conditional Cash Transfers on the Matriculation of Junior High School Students into Rural China’s High Schools," LICOS Discussion Papers 36815, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
  • Handle: RePEc:lic:licosd:36815
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Fan Li & Prashant Loyalka & Hongmei Yi & Yaojiang Shi & Natalie Johnson & Scott Rozelle, 2016. "Ability Tracking and Social Capital in China’s Rural Secondary School System," LICOS Discussion Papers 37916, LICOS - Centre for Institutions and Economic Performance, KU Leuven.
    2. Fan Li & Prashant Loyalka & Hongmei Yi, 2016. "Ability Tracking and Social Capital in China’s Rural Secondary School System," Working Papers id:10972, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Conditional Cash Transfer; Voucher; Rural Education; Dropout; High School; Randomized Controlled Trial; China;

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