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Does financial aid help poor students succeed in college?


  • Wang, Xiaobing
  • Liu, Chengfang
  • Zhang, Linxiu
  • Yue, Ai
  • Shi, Yaojiang
  • Chu, James
  • Rozelle, Scott


The rapid expansion of enrollment capacity in China's colleges since the late 1990s has come at the price of high tuition hikes. China's government has put forth financial aid programs to enable poor students to access higher education. Although studies have shown that poor high school students are indeed able to attend college when their test scores are high enough (that is, few are unable to attend when they are qualified to attend), the literature has not explored whether poor students have sufficient amounts of aid to thrive in college.

Suggested Citation

  • Wang, Xiaobing & Liu, Chengfang & Zhang, Linxiu & Yue, Ai & Shi, Yaojiang & Chu, James & Rozelle, Scott, 2013. "Does financial aid help poor students succeed in college?," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 27-43.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:chieco:v:25:y:2013:i:c:p:27-43
    DOI: 10.1016/j.chieco.2013.01.003

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Edward Miguel & Michael Kremer, 2004. "Worms: Identifying Impacts on Education and Health in the Presence of Treatment Externalities," Econometrica, Econometric Society, vol. 72(1), pages 159-217, January.
    2. Liu, Chengfang & Zhang, Linxiu & Luo, Renfu & Wang, Xiaobing & Rozelle, Scott & Sharbono, Brian & Adams, Jennifer & Shi, Yaojiang & Yue, Ai & Li, Hongbin & Glauben, Thomas, 2011. "Early commitment on financial aid and college decision making of poor students: Evidence from a randomized evaluation in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(4), pages 627-640, August.
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    Cited by:

    1. Fan Li & Yingquan Song & Hongmei Yi & Jianguo Wei & Linxiu Zhang & Yaojiang Shi & James Chu & Natalie Johnson & Prashant Loyalka & Scott Rozelle, 2017. "The impact of conditional cash transfers on the matriculation of junior high school students into rural China’s high schools," Journal of Development Effectiveness, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 9(1), pages 41-60, January.
    2. Yaojiang Shi & Yu Bai & Yanni Shen & Kaleigh Kenny & Scott Rozelle, 2016. "Effects of Parental Migration on Mental Health of Left-behind Children: Evidence from Northwestern China," China & World Economy, Institute of World Economics and Politics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 24(3), pages 105-122, May.

    More about this item


    College; Financial aid; Stress; Self-esteem; Randomized controlled trial; China;

    JEL classification:

    • A22 - General Economics and Teaching - - Economic Education and Teaching of Economics - - - Undergraduate
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy


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