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Finance, Growth And Fragility

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  • Panicos O. Demetriades

    ()

  • Peter L. Rousseau

    ()

  • Johan Rewilak

    ()

Abstract

We utilise a new international database of financial fragility indicators for 124 countries from 1998 to 2012 to investigate the effects of fragility on the finance-growth nexus. Cross-country growth regressions suggest that both financial fragility and private credit have negative effects on GDP growth over this period. The results are robust to controlling for systemic banking crises, confirming that financial fragility has additional negative effects on growth, even if a banking crisis is avoided. We also present results using interactions which suggest that (a) a large volume of impaired loans can amplify the negative effects of private credit on growth and (b) a sufficiently high z-score can eradicate the negative effects of private credit on growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Panicos O. Demetriades & Peter L. Rousseau & Johan Rewilak, 2017. "Finance, Growth And Fragility," Discussion Papers in Economics 17/13, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
  • Handle: RePEc:lec:leecon:17/13
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    File URL: https://www.le.ac.uk/economics/research/RePEc/lec/leecon/dp17-13.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Loayza, Norman V. & Ranciere, Romain, 2006. "Financial Development, Financial Fragility, and Growth," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 38(4), pages 1051-1076, June.
    2. Svetlana Andrianova & Badi Baltagi & Thorsten Beck & Panicos Demetriades & David Fielding & Stephen Hall & Steven Koch & Robert Lensink & Johan Rewilak & Peter Rousseau, 2015. "A New International Database on Financial Fragility," Discussion Papers in Economics 15/18, Division of Economics, School of Business, University of Leicester.
    3. Peter L. Rousseau & Paul Wachtel, 2011. "What Is Happening To The Impact Of Financial Deepening On Economic Growth?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(1), pages 276-288, January.
    4. Ang, James B., 2011. "Financial development, liberalization and technological deepening," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(5), pages 688-701, June.
    5. Rioja, Felix & Valev, Neven, 2004. "Does one size fit all?: a reexamination of the finance and growth relationship," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 74(2), pages 429-447, August.
    6. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Hussein, Khaled A., 1996. "Does financial development cause economic growth? Time-series evidence from 16 countries," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(2), pages 387-411, December.
    7. Andrianova, Svetlana & Demetriades, Panicos & Shortland, Anja, 2008. "Government ownership of banks, institutions, and financial development," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 85(1-2), pages 218-252, February.
    8. Deidda, Luca & Fattouh, Bassam, 2002. "Non-linearity between finance and growth," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 74(3), pages 339-345, February.
    9. Jaremski, Matthew & Rousseau, Peter L., 2018. "The dawn of an ‘age of deposits’ in the United States," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 87(C), pages 264-281.
    10. Svetlana Andrianova & Panicos Demetriades & Anja Shortland, 2012. "Government Ownership of Banks, Institutions and Economic Growth," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 79(315), pages 449-469, July.
    11. Demetriades, Panicos O. & Rousseau, Peter L., 2016. "The changing face of financial development," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 87-90.
    12. Jean Arcand & Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza, 2015. "Too much finance?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 20(2), pages 105-148, June.
    13. Christiane Kneer, 2013. "Finance as a Magnet for the Best and Brightest: Implications for the Real Economy," DNB Working Papers 392, Netherlands Central Bank, Research Department.
    14. Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza & Jean Louis Arcand, 2015. "Too Much Finance or Statistical Illusion: A Comment," IHEID Working Papers 12-2015, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
    15. Rousseau, Peter L., 1998. "The permanent effects of innovation on financial depth:: Theory and US historical evidence from unobservable components models," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 42(2), pages 387-425, July.
    16. Luc Laeven & Fabián Valencia, 2013. "Systemic Banking Crises Database," IMF Economic Review, Palgrave Macmillan;International Monetary Fund, vol. 61(2), pages 225-270, June.
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