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Too Much Finance or Statistical Illusion: A Comment

Author

Listed:
  • Enrico Berkes

    (Northwestern University)

  • Ugo Panizza

    (The Graduate Institute, Geneva and CEPR)

  • Jean Louis Arcand

    (The Graduate Institute, Geneva)

Abstract

A recent policy brief from Peterson Institute suggests that "Too Much Finance" result may be an artifact of spurious attribution of causality. While more work needs to be done to understand the links between finance and growth and explore the drivers of possible non-monotonicities, this note shows that the too much finance result is robust.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrico Berkes & Ugo Panizza & Jean Louis Arcand, 2015. "Too Much Finance or Statistical Illusion: A Comment," IHEID Working Papers 12-2015, Economics Section, The Graduate Institute of International Studies.
  • Handle: RePEc:gii:giihei:heidwp12-2015
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    8. repec:imf:imfsdn:15/8 is not listed on IDEAS
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