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Climate Shocks and (very) Long-Run Productivity

Author

Listed:
  • Carl-Johan Dalgaard

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen and CEPR)

  • Casper Worm Hansen

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen
    Kraka)

Abstract

The present study examines the link between temperature and long-run productivity for a balanced panel of 21 countries, covering the period 1000?1800 CE. Collectively the countries examined accounted for about 2/3 of the global population by 1700. Each epoch in the analysis is a century long, which thus allows time for human adaptation after a temperature shock has occurred. Our principal ?nding is that lower temperatures worked to reduce productivity growth during the period in focus, consistent with contributions to the literature in economic history that argue the Little Ice Age was as a contractionary shock.

Suggested Citation

  • Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Casper Worm Hansen, 2015. "Climate Shocks and (very) Long-Run Productivity," Discussion Papers 15-15, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:1515
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/dp_2015/1515.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Paola Giuliano & Nathan Nunn, 2017. "Understanding Cultural Persistence and Change," NBER Working Papers 23617, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Iyigun, Murat & Nunn, Nathan & Qian, Nancy, 2017. "Winter is Coming: The Long-Run Effects of Climate Change on Conflict, 1400-1900," IZA Discussion Papers 10475, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Climate shocks; Little Ice Age; Productivity growth;

    JEL classification:

    • O47 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Empirical Studies of Economic Growth; Aggregate Productivity; Cross-Country Output Convergence
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries
    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative

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