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Life Cycle Savings, Bequest, and the Diminishing Impact of Scale on Growth

Author

Listed:
  • Carl-Johan Dalgaard

    (Department of Economics, University of Copenhagen)

  • Martin Kaae Jensen

    (University of Birmingham)

Abstract

There appears to be ample evidence that the size of population acted as a stimulus to growth in historical times; scale mattered. In the post World War II era, however, there is little evidence of such scale effects on growth. Where did the scale effect go? The present paper shows that the savings motive critically affects the size and sign of scale effects in standard endogenous growth models. If the bequest motive dominates, the scale effect is positive. If the life cycle motive dominates, the scale effect is ambiguous and may be negative. A declining importance of bequest in capital accumulation could therefore be one reason why scale seems to matter less today than in historical times.

Suggested Citation

  • Carl-Johan Dalgaard & Martin Kaae Jensen, 2007. "Life Cycle Savings, Bequest, and the Diminishing Impact of Scale on Growth," Discussion Papers 07-17, University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:kud:kuiedp:0717
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    File URL: http://www.econ.ku.dk/english/research/publications/wp/2007/0717.pdf/
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Galor, Oded, 1996. "Convergence? Inferences from Theoretical Models," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 106(437), pages 1056-1069, July.
    2. Luis A. Rivera-Batiz & Paul M. Romer, 1991. "Economic Integration and Endogenous Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 106(2), pages 531-555.
    3. Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Kreiner, Claus Thustrup, 2001. "Is Declining Productivity Inevitable?," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 6(3), pages 187-203, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Aiyar, Shekhar & Dalgaard, Carl-Johan, 2009. "Accounting for productivity: Is it OK to assume that the world is Cobb-Douglas?," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 290-303, June.
    2. Grossmann, Volker, 2009. "Entrepreneurial innovation and economic growth," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 602-613, December.
    3. Lars Kunze & Christiane Schuppert, 2010. "Financing social security by taxing capital income: A bad idea?," FinanzArchiv: Public Finance Analysis, Mohr Siebeck, Tübingen, vol. 66(3), pages 243-262, September.
    4. repec:zbw:rwirep:0113 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Kunze, Lars, 2010. "Capital taxation, long-run growth, and bequests," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 1067-1082, December.
    6. repec:zbw:rwirep:0090 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Lars Kunze, 2009. "Capital Taxation, Long-run Growth, and Bequests," Ruhr Economic Papers 0113, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    8. Lars Kunze & Christiane Schuppert, 2009. "Financing Social Security by Taxing Capital Income – A Bad Idea?," Ruhr Economic Papers 0090, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    overlapping generations; endogenous growth; scale effects;

    JEL classification:

    • O41 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - One, Two, and Multisector Growth Models
    • O57 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Comparative Studies of Countries

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