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Life-cycle savings, bequest, and a diminishing impact of scale on growth

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  • Dalgaard, Carl-Johan
  • Jensen, Martin Kaae

Abstract

The present paper shows that the savings motive critically affects the size and sign of scale effects in standard endogenous growth models. If the bequest motive dominates, the scale effect is positive. If the life-cycle motive dominates, the scale effect is ambiguous and may even be negative.

Suggested Citation

  • Dalgaard, Carl-Johan & Jensen, Martin Kaae, 2009. "Life-cycle savings, bequest, and a diminishing impact of scale on growth," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 33(9), pages 1639-1647, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:dyncon:v:33:y:2009:i:9:p:1639-1647
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Bharat Diwakar & Gilad Sorek, 2015. "Finite Lifetimes, Population, and Growth," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2015-14, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
    2. Gilad Sorek & Bharat Diwakar, 2017. "Weak Scale Effects in Overlapping Generations Economy," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 37(2), pages 962-969.
    3. Bharat Diwakar & Gilad Sorek, 2016. "Life-Cycle Saving, Bequests, and the Role of Population in R&D-based Growth," Auburn Economics Working Paper Series auwp2016-05, Department of Economics, Auburn University.
    4. Strulik, Holger & Prettner, Klaus & Prskawetz, Alexia, 2010. "R\&D-based Growth in the Post-modern Era," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-457, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
    5. Chatzouz, Moustafa, 2014. "Government Debt and Wealth Inequality: Theory and Insights from Altruism," MPRA Paper 77007, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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