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Estimation of Vulnerability to Poverty Using a Multilevel Longitudinal Model: Evidence from the Philippines

Author

Listed:
  • Christian D. Mina

    (Philippine Institute for Development Studies (PIDS), the Philippines)

  • Katsushi S. Imai

    (School of Social Sciences, University of Manchester (UK) and RIEB, Kobe University (Japan))

Abstract

This study estimates household vulnerability in the Philippines using a three-level and longitudinal linear random-coefficient model whereby vulnerability is decomposed into idiosyncratic and covariate components. Our three-wave panel data covering the period 2003-2009 allow us to analyse poverty situations in both vulnerability and poverty persistence dimensions. A majority of the poor and a third of the non-poor are found to be vulnerable to unobservable shocks, while more susceptible to unobservable idiosyncratic shocks than to covariate shocks. Adequate safety nets should be provided for vulnerable households with less-educated and agriculturally-engaged or jobless heads, rural dwellers, or with more members and/or dependents.

Suggested Citation

  • Christian D. Mina & Katsushi S. Imai, 2015. "Estimation of Vulnerability to Poverty Using a Multilevel Longitudinal Model: Evidence from the Philippines," Discussion Paper Series DP2015-16, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  • Handle: RePEc:kob:dpaper:dp2015-16
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    File URL: https://www.rieb.kobe-u.ac.jp/academic/ra/dp/English/DP2015-16.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:134:y:2017:i:1:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1419-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Bresciani, F. & Imai, K.S. & Malaeb, B., 2017. "IFAD RESEARCH SERIES 15 - Remittances, growth and poverty reduction in Asia," IFAD Research Series 280053, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD).
    3. Mina, Christian D., 2017. "Employment Profile of Women with Disabilities in San Remigio and Mandaue City, Cebu, Philippines," Discussion Papers DP 2017-57, Philippine Institute for Development Studies.
    4. Christian D. Mina & Celia M. Reyes, 2017. "Estimating Filipinos' Vulnerability to Poverty," Working Papers id:12080, eSocialSciences.
    5. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy & Lora Baje, 2017. "Chronic Food Poverty in the Philippines," Working Papers id:12071, eSocialSciences.
    6. Connie Bayudan-Dacuycuy & Lora Baje, 2017. "Chronic and Transient Poverty and Weather Variability in the Philippines: Evidence Using Components Approach," Working Papers id:12072, eSocialSciences.
    7. Christian D. Mina, 2018. "Employment Profile of Women with Disabilities in San Remigio and Mandaue City, Cebu, Philippines," Working Papers id:12859, eSocialSciences.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Vulnerability; Poverty; Multilevel model; Panel data; The Philippines;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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