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The Short-Term Impact of Crime on School Enrollment and School Choice: Evidence from El Salvador

Author

Listed:
  • Juan Nelson Martinez Dahbura

    (Faculty of Economics, Keio University)

Abstract

This research employs household survey data from El Salvador to evaluate the short-term impact of several measures of crime and a truce between gangs during 2012 on school enrollment and the choice between public and private education for individuals 7 to 22 years old in 2013. The results show that homicides, thefts, robberies and extortions are significantly associated with lower school enrollment and higher attendance to public schools among boys in several age brackets. A robust positive impact of homicide rates and school enrollment for girls under 15 years old, and a positive association between property crimes and the choice of private schools for older girls is observed, possibly reflecting selective investment choices of parents.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan Nelson Martinez Dahbura, 2016. "The Short-Term Impact of Crime on School Enrollment and School Choice: Evidence from El Salvador," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2016-012, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
  • Handle: RePEc:keo:dpaper:2016-012
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    DEMAND FOR SCHOOLING; SCHOOL CHOICE; CRIME; El Salvador;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I25 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Economic Development

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