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Violence in Mexico: An economic rationale of crime and its impacts

Author

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  • Enrique Leonardo Kato Vidal

    () (Universidad Autonoma de Querétaro.)

Abstract

La violencia se identifica como un obstaculo para el crecimiento economico en Mexico. Este articulo tiene un objetivo doble: 1) explicar la alta incidencia de homicidios y 2) estimar el impacto de la violencia sobre la economia. La ecuacion utilizada a la Becker se compone de los beneficios y costos de optar por la actividad criminal. La estimacion se realizo con un panel dinamico con datos trimestrales de las 32 entidades federativas. Se hallo que una mayor tasa de sentencias podria inhibir el surgimiento de la violencia, en cambio una mayor tasa de participacion laboral incentiva mayor incidencia delictiva. Tambien se encontro que un aumento del crimen incide negativamente sobre el salario y la tasa de empleadores. A pesar de la fuerte inercia de la violencia es posible reducir la tasa de homicidios si se logra incrementar la tasa de sentencias y un crecimiento economico que permita reducir el desempleo.

Suggested Citation

  • Enrique Leonardo Kato Vidal, 2015. "Violence in Mexico: An economic rationale of crime and its impacts," EconoQuantum, Revista de Economia y Negocios, Universidad de Guadalajara, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Economico Administrativas, Departamento de Metodos Cuantitativos y Maestria en Economia., vol. 12(2), pages 93-108, Julio-Dic.
  • Handle: RePEc:qua:journl:v:12:y:2015:i:2:p:93-108
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    File URL: http://www.revistascientificas.udg.mx/index.php/EQ/article/view/4862/4542
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Eide, Erling & Rubin, Paul H. & Shepherd, Joanna M., 2006. "Economics of Crime," Foundations and Trends(R) in Microeconomics, now publishers, vol. 2(3), pages 205-279, December.
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    3. Gerardo Esquivel, 2011. "The Dynamics of Income Inequality in Mexico since NAFTA," ECONOMIA JOURNAL, THE LATIN AMERICAN AND CARIBBEAN ECONOMIC ASSOCIATION - LACEA, vol. 0(Fall 2011), pages 155-188, August.
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    5. GholamReza Keshavarz Haddad & Hamed Markazi Moghadam, 2011. "The socioeconomic and demographic determinants of crime in Iran (a regional panel study)," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 32(1), pages 99-114, August.
    6. Enamorado, Ted & López-Calva, Luis F. & Rodríguez-Castelán, Carlos, 2014. "Crime and growth convergence: Evidence from Mexico," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 125(1), pages 9-13.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Economia del crimen; Disuasion; Mexico.;

    JEL classification:

    • O54 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Latin America; Caribbean
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development
    • C01 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - General - - - Econometrics

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