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Environmental Disasters and Migration

Author

Listed:
  • Mbaye, Linguère Mously

    () (African Development Bank)

  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    () (University of Bonn)

Abstract

This paper reviews the effect of environmental disasters on migration. Although there is an increase of environmental disasters and migration over the past years, the relationship is complex. While some authors find that environmental disasters increase migration, others show that they have only a marginal or no effect or are even negative. Migration appears to be an insurance mechanism against environmental shocks. Remittances help to decrease households' vulnerability to shocks but also dampen their adverse effects. Finally, we discuss policy implications and future research avenues.

Suggested Citation

  • Mbaye, Linguère Mously & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2015. "Environmental Disasters and Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 9349, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp9349
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp9349.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Leah Platt Boustan & Matthew E. Kahn & Paul W. Rhode, 2012. "Moving to Higher Ground: Migration Response to Natural Disasters in the Early Twentieth Century," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 238-244, May.
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    9. Drabo, Alassane & Mbaye, Linguère Mously, 2015. "Natural disasters, migration and education: an empirical analysis in developing countries," Environment and Development Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 20(6), pages 767-796, December.
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    16. repec:ilo:ilowps:343999 is not listed on IDEAS
    17. Ghimire, Ramesh & Ferreira, Susana & Dorfman, Jeffrey H., 2015. "Flood-Induced Displacement and Civil Conflict," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 614-628.
    18. HwaJung Choi, 2007. "Are Remittances Insurance? Evidence from Rainfall Shocks in the Philippines," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 21(2), pages 219-248, May.
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    Cited by:

    1. repec:oup:cesifo:v:63:y:2017:i:4:p:445-480. is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Eugenia Chernina, 2019. "Natural Shocks And Migration Decisions: The Case Of Kyrgyzstan," HSE Working papers WP BRP 214/EC/2019, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    3. Asif Ishtiaque & Nurul Islam Nazem, 2017. "Household-level disaster-induced losses and rural–urban migration: Experience from world’s one of the most disaster-affected countries," Natural Hazards: Journal of the International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, Springer;International Society for the Prevention and Mitigation of Natural Hazards, vol. 86(1), pages 315-326, March.
    4. Jasmin Gröschl & Thomas Steinwachs, 2017. "Do Natural Hazards Cause International Migration?," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 63(4), pages 445-480.
    5. repec:ces:ifobei:81 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    migration as insurance; remittances; forced migration; environmental shocks; floods; earthquakes; droughts;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • Q54 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Climate; Natural Disasters and their Management; Global Warming
    • Q56 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Environment and Development; Environment and Trade; Sustainability; Environmental Accounts and Accounting; Environmental Equity; Population Growth

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