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Natural Shocks And Migration Decisions: The Case Of Kyrgyzstan

Author

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  • Eugenia Chernina

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics)

Abstract

Previous research has shown that the effects of natural shocks on household migration decisions may go in different directions. This paper explores the impact of natural shocks (self-reported) on the migration of members of Kyrgyz rural households. Employing a panel dataset from the Life in Kyrgyzstan Survey (2010-2013) we show that out of five studied shocks only droughts and floods negatively affect migration, while other shocks (cold winters, earthquakes and landslides) on average do not lead to any statistically significant change in migration. However, available migration networks, household financial capacity and involvement in agriculture are sources of differential impacts. Exploring the means of migration funding, we find that both liquidity and borrowing constraints are important for the poorest households. Help from friends and relatives for financing migration, if it comes, is sourced to rich households

Suggested Citation

  • Eugenia Chernina, 2019. "Natural Shocks And Migration Decisions: The Case Of Kyrgyzstan," HSE Working papers WP BRP 214/EC/2019, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:hig:wpaper:214/ec/2019
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    labour migration; migration decision; Kyrgyzstan; natural disasters; financial constraints;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Z - Other Special Topics

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