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Gender Differences in Cooperation: Experimental Evidence on High School Students

Author

Listed:
  • Molina, José Alberto

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Cuesta, José A.

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Garcia-Lazaro, Carlos

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Moreno, Yamir

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Sanchez, Angel

    () (University of Zaragoza)

Abstract

Charles Darwin (1874) stated that "women are less selfish but men are more competitive". Very recent papers (Eckel & Grossman, 1998, 2001 or Andreoni and Vesterlund 2001, among others) have shown the relevance of gender in altruism in both ultimatum and dictator games. In this paper we analyze the role of gender in repeated Prisoners' Dilemma played by Spanish high-school students in both a square lattice and a heterogeneous network. We find that female students have a higher probability of cooperation than male students.

Suggested Citation

  • Molina, José Alberto & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Cuesta, José A. & Garcia-Lazaro, Carlos & Moreno, Yamir & Sanchez, Angel, 2013. "Gender Differences in Cooperation: Experimental Evidence on High School Students," IZA Discussion Papers 7421, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7421
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Kreps, David M. & Milgrom, Paul & Roberts, John & Wilson, Robert, 1982. "Rational cooperation in the finitely repeated prisoners' dilemma," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 245-252, August.
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    3. Andreoni, James A & Miller, John H, 1993. "Rational Cooperation in the Finitely Repeated Prisoner's Dilemma: Experimental Evidence," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(418), pages 570-585, May.
    4. Eckel, Catherine C & Grossman, Philip J, 1998. "Are Women Less Selfish Than Men? Evidence from Dictator Experiments," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 108(448), pages 726-735, May.
    5. James Andreoni & Lise Vesterlund, 2001. "Which is the Fair Sex? Gender Differences in Altruism," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 116(1), pages 293-312.
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    11. Drew Fudenberg & Jean Tirole, 1991. "Game Theory," MIT Press Books, The MIT Press, edition 1, volume 1, number 0262061414, January.
    12. Inmaculada García-Mainar & José Alberto Molina & Víctor M. Montuenga, 2011. "Gender Differences in Childcare: Time Allocation in Five European Countries," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 17(1), pages 119-150, January.
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    15. McElroy, Marjorie B & Horney, Mary Jean, 1981. "Nash-Bargained Household Decisions: Toward a Generalization of the Theory of Demand," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 22(2), pages 333-349, June.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Gimenez-Nadal, Jose Ignacio & Molina, Jose Alberto, 2017. "The Substitution Effect and the Profit Function in Consumption: expressions from the Marshallian, Hicksian, and Frischian demand functions," MPRA Paper 82249, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ferrando-Latorre, Sandra, 2017. "Risky consumption and intergenerational mobility: a research program in a family context," MPRA Paper 79777, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. repec:eee:soceco:v:68:y:2017:i:c:p:119-129 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. José Alberto Molina & Alfredo Ferrer & José Ignacio Gimenez-Nadal & Carlos Gracia-Lazaro & Yamir Moreno & Angel Sanchez, 2016. "The effect of kinship on intergenerational cooperation: A lab experiment with three generations," Boston College Working Papers in Economics 905, Boston College Department of Economics.
    5. Campaña, Juan Carlos, 2017. "¿Pueden llegar a ser adictivos los comportamientos juveniles sedentarios en el hogar? Un programa de investigación con respuestas conceptuales y evidencia empírica
      [Can sedentary youth behaviors be
      ," MPRA Paper 81401, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    6. José Molina, 2013. "Altruism in the household: in kind transfers in the context of kin selection," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 11(3), pages 309-312, September.
    7. García, Lucia & Molina, José Alberto, 2017. "The household structure: recent international evolution," MPRA Paper 82049, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. García, Lucia, 2018. "Inter-generational and intra-generational transfers: international evidence," MPRA Paper 83986, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    gender differences; cooperation; high school students; prisoners' dilemma;

    JEL classification:

    • C72 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Noncooperative Games
    • C73 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Game Theory and Bargaining Theory - - - Stochastic and Dynamic Games; Evolutionary Games
    • C93 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - Field Experiments
    • D03 - Microeconomics - - General - - - Behavioral Microeconomics: Underlying Principles
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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