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Racial Discrimination and Household Chores

Author

Listed:
  • Grossbard, Shoshana

    () (San Diego State University)

  • Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio

    () (University of Zaragoza)

  • Molina, José Alberto

    () (University of Zaragoza)

Abstract

We make the novel argument that time spent on household chores can possibly reflect racial discrimination based on color. Our model, based on Becker's theory of allocation of time and his theory of marriage, recognizes that both intra-household bargaining and hedonic marriage markets operating with the help of an implicit price mechanism can lead to a premium for those who perform chores work in households and have lighter skin than their partners. Conversely, those with darker skin need to pay a compensating differential. To test our model, we design a 'race difference' scale that captures each partner’s race and ranges between 2 and -2. Based on the American Time Use Survey 2003-2009 we find that for every unit bringing a couple closer to the case of a "White" respondent and a "Black" partner, the respondent reduces his or her weekly hours of chores work by 37 minutes. Marriage markets appear to be influenced by racial discrimination based on color.

Suggested Citation

  • Grossbard, Shoshana & Gimenez-Nadal, J. Ignacio & Molina, José Alberto, 2010. "Racial Discrimination and Household Chores," IZA Discussion Papers 5345, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp5345
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gary S. Becker & Kevin M. Murphy & Robert Tamura, 1994. "Human Capital, Fertility, and Economic Growth," NBER Chapters,in: Human Capital: A Theoretical and Empirical Analysis with Special Reference to Education (3rd Edition), pages 323-350 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Hamermesh, Daniel S., 2007. "AJAE Appendix: Time to Eat: Household Production Under Increasing Income Inequality," American Journal of Agricultural Economics APPENDICES, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 0(Number 4), pages 1-8, November.
    3. Grossbard, Shoshana, 2010. "How “Chicagoan” Are Gary Becker’S Economic Models Of Marriage?," Journal of the History of Economic Thought, Cambridge University Press, vol. 32(03), pages 377-395, September.
    4. Joni Hersch, 2008. "Profiling the New Immigrant Worker: The Effects of Skin Color and Height," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 345-386, April.
    5. Hans G. Bloemen & Silvia Pasqua & Elena G. F. Stancanelli, 2008. "An Empirical Analysis Of The Time Allocation Of Italian Couples: Are Italian Men Irresponsive?," CHILD Working Papers wp18_08, CHILD - Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic economics - ITALY.
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    11. Burda, Michael C. & Hamermesh, Daniel S. & Weil, Philippe, 2006. "The Distribution of Total Work in the EU and US," IZA Discussion Papers 2270, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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    Cited by:

    1. Chunbei Wang & Le Wang, 2012. "The effects of 9/11 on intermarriage between natives and immigrants to the U.S," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 171-192, June.
    2. Markus Grabka & Jan Marcus & Eva Sierminska, 2015. "Wealth distribution within couples," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 13(3), pages 459-486, September.
    3. Pierre-André CHIAPPORI & Sonia OREFFICE & Climent QUINTANA-DOMEQUE, 2016. "Black-White Marital Matching: Race, Anthtopometrics and Socioeconomics," JODE - Journal of Demographic Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 82(4), pages 399-421, December.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    racial discrimination; compensating differentials; household chores; time use;

    JEL classification:

    • D13 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - Household Production and Intrahouse Allocation
    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J12 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Marriage; Marital Dissolution; Family Structure
    • J22 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Time Allocation and Labor Supply

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