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Part-Time Work, Gender and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from a Developing Country

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  • López Bóo, Florencia

    () (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Madrigal, Lucia

    () (Inter-American Development Bank)

  • Pagés, Carmen

    () (Inter-American Development Bank)

Abstract

This paper investigates the relationship between part-time work and job satisfaction using a recent household survey from Honduras. In contrast to previous work for developed countries, this paper does not find a preference for part-time work among women. Instead, both women and men tend to prefer full- time work, although the preference for working longer hours is stronger for men. Consistent with an interpretation of working part-time as luxury consumption, the paper finds that partnered women with children, poor women or women working in the informal sector are more likely to prefer full-time work than single women, partnered women without children, non-poor women or women working in the formal sector. These results have important implications for the design of family and child care policies in low-income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • López Bóo, Florencia & Madrigal, Lucia & Pagés, Carmen, 2009. "Part-Time Work, Gender and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from a Developing Country," IZA Discussion Papers 3994, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp3994
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Eduardo Lora, 2013. "The Distance between Perception and Reality in the Social Domains of Life," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 4608, Inter-American Development Bank.
    2. María Lopez-Ruiz & Fernando G. Benavides & Alejandra Vives & Lucía Artazcoz, 2017. "Informal employment, unpaid care work, and health status in Spanish-speaking Central American countries: a gender-based approach," International Journal of Public Health, Springer;Swiss School of Public Health (SSPH+), vol. 62(2), pages 209-218, March.
    3. Fernández-Kranz, Daniel & Rodríguez-Planas, Núria, 2011. "The part-time pay penalty in a segmented labor market," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(5), pages 591-606, October.
    4. Sherman, Arie & Shavit, Tal, 2013. "The immaterial sustenance of work and leisure: A new look at the work–leisure model," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 10-16.
    5. Madrigal, Lucia & Pagés, Carmen & Suaya, Agustina, 2016. "The Value of Social Security: Are Formal Jobs Better?," IZA Discussion Papers 9866, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    6. Fagan, Colette. & Norman, Helen. & Smith, Mark. & Gonzalez Menendez, María C., 2014. "In search of good quality part-time employment," ILO Working Papers 994839683402676, International Labour Organization.
    7. Yuliya Frolova, 2014. "What Job will Bring Satisfaction? An Analysis based on Responses of Students Studying Business in Kazakhstan," Eurasian Journal of Business and Management, Eurasian Publications, vol. 2(2), pages 25-49.
    8. Falco, Paolo & Maloney, William F. & Rijkers, Bob & Sarrias, Mauricio, 2015. "Heterogeneity in subjective wellbeing: An application to occupational allocation in Africa," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 111(C), pages 137-153.
    9. Zhiming Cheng, 2014. "The Effects of Employee Involvement and Participation on Subjective Wellbeing: Evidence from Urban China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(2), pages 457-483, September.
    10. Tomás Rau B., 2010. "Part-Time Work in Chile," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 13(1), pages 39-59, April.
    11. Rodrigo Montero & Diego Vásquez, 2015. "Job Satisfaction and Reference Wages: Evidence for a Developing Country," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 16(6), pages 1493-1507, December.
    12. Rita Almeida & Pedro Carneiro, Renata Narita, 2013. "Producing Higher Quality Jobs: Enforcement of Mandated Benefits across Brazilian Cities between 1996-2007," Working Papers, Department of Economics 2013_22, University of São Paulo (FEA-USP).
    13. repec:ilo:ilowps:483968 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. VAN DEN BROECK, Goedele & MAERTENS, Miet, 2015. "Does Off-farm Employment Make Women in Rural Senegal Happy?," Working Papers 232593, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Centre for Agricultural and Food Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    part-time work; gender; job satisfaction; job flexibility;

    JEL classification:

    • C13 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Estimation: General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J28 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Safety; Job Satisfaction; Related Public Policy

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