IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/chb/bcchec/v13y2010i1p39-59.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Part-Time Work in Chile

Author

Listed:
  • Tomás Rau B.

Abstract

This article discusses the evolution and determinants of part-time work in Chile. It tests some hypotheses found in the international literature, to determine whether part-time work is precarious, whether hourly payment is smaller, and whether it constitutes a step toward full-time employment. Evidence is found that part-time work is mostly feminine, and can be precarious in that it can be less stable and more informal. However, hourly wage is slightly higher than in full-time jobs. This gap is examined through a decomposition of Oaxaca, which reveals that wage differences cannot be explained by observable factors. It concludes with a Markov chain analysis using the Casen surveys to determine whether part-time jobs are a transition to full-time jobs, and also steady-state part-time participation is projected, as are long-term participation and employment rates. The results show that, given the current dynamics, the relative share of part-time work over total employment will remain stable, and labor participation will attain the level of developed economies in no less than 25 years.

Suggested Citation

  • Tomás Rau B., 2010. "Part-Time Work in Chile," Journal Economía Chilena (The Chilean Economy), Central Bank of Chile, vol. 13(1), pages 39-59, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:chb:bcchec:v:13:y:2010:i:1:p:39-59
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://si2.bcentral.cl/public/pdf/revista-economia/2010/abr/recv13n1abr2010pp39-59.pdf
    Download Restriction: no

    Other versions of this item:

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Alan Manning & Barbara Petrongolo, 2008. "The Part-Time Pay Penalty for Women in Britain," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 28-51, February.
    2. Van de Ven, Wynand P. M. M. & Van Praag, Bernard M. S., 1981. "The demand for deductibles in private health insurance : A probit model with sample selection," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 17(2), pages 229-252, November.
    3. Florencia Lopez Boo & Lucia Madrigal & Carmen Pages, 2010. "Part-Time Work, Gender and Job Satisfaction: Evidence from a Developing Country," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(9), pages 1543-1571.
    4. Mary Gregory & Sara Connolly, 2008. "Feature: The Price of Reconciliation: Part-Time Work, Families and Women's Satisfaction," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 1-7, February.
    5. Gillian Paull, 2008. "Children and Women's Hours of Work," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 118(526), pages 8-27, February.
    6. Frances Lund & Suzanne Duryea & Esteban Puentes & Andrew Morrison & Jaime Tenjo Galarza & Manuelita Ureta & Dante Contreras & Alejandra Cox Edwards & Ruthanne Deutsch & Rocío Ribero Medina & Armando B, 2004. "Women at Work: Challenges for Latin America," IDB Publications (Books), Inter-American Development Bank, number 79462 edited by Claudia Piras, February.
    7. Dekker, Ronald, 2008. "Part-time work as a transitional phase? The role of preferences and institutions in Germany, Great Britain and The Netherlands," MPRA Paper 8029, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. F. L. Jones & Jonathan Kelley, 1984. "Decomposing Differences between Groups," Sociological Methods & Research, , vol. 12(3), pages 323-343, February.
    9. repec:idb:idbbks:424 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure
    • J41 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Labor Contracts
    • C33 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:chb:bcchec:v:13:y:2010:i:1:p:39-59. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Claudio Sepulveda). General contact details of provider: http://edirc.repec.org/data/bccgvcl.html .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.