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The Effect of Education on Geographic Mobility: Incidence, Timing, and Type of Migration

Author

Listed:
  • Aydemir, Abdurrahman

    (Sabanci University)

  • Kirdar, Murat G.

    (Bogazici University)

  • Torun, Huzeyfe

    (Central Bank of Turkey)

Abstract

We take advantage of a major compulsory school reform in Turkey to provide novel evidence on the causal effect of education on both the incidence and timing of internal migration. In addition, for the first time in literature, we provide causal effects of education on migration by reason for migration. We find that while education substantially increases the incidence of migration among men, there is no evidence of an effect among women. Women, however, become more likely to migrate at earlier ages and their migration reasons change. Revealing the empowering role of education, women become more likely to move for human capital investments and for employment purposes and less likely to be tied-movers.

Suggested Citation

  • Aydemir, Abdurrahman & Kirdar, Murat G. & Torun, Huzeyfe, 2021. "The Effect of Education on Geographic Mobility: Incidence, Timing, and Type of Migration," IZA Discussion Papers 14013, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp14013
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Caner, Asena & Demirel, Merve & Okten, Cagla, 2019. "Attainment and Gender Equality in Higher Education: Evidence from a Large Scale Expansion," IZA Discussion Papers 12711, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Dayioglu-Tayfur, Meltem & Kirdar, Murat G., 2020. "Keeping Kids in School and Out of Work: Compulsory Schooling and Child Labor in Turkey," IZA Discussion Papers 13276, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Akyol, Pelin & Kirdar, Murat G., 2020. "Does Education Really Cause Domestic Violence? Replication and Reappraisal of "For Better or For Worse? Education and the Prevalence of Domestic Violence in Turkey"," IZA Discussion Papers 14001, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; internal migration; incidence and timing of migration; reason for migration; 2SLS; regression discontinuity design;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education

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