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The relationship between schooling and migration: Evidence from compulsory schooling laws

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  • McHenry, Peter

Abstract

I estimate the effect of schooling on the propensity to migrate by exploiting variation in schooling due to compulsory schooling laws (CSLs) in the United States. I obtain negative estimates of this effect among those with relatively little schooling. In contrast, previous research estimates positive schooling effects on migration at higher levels of schooling. I speculate that additional schooling at low levels enhances local labor market contacts and thereby increases the opportunity cost of migration (leaving those contacts behind).

Suggested Citation

  • McHenry, Peter, 2013. "The relationship between schooling and migration: Evidence from compulsory schooling laws," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 24-40.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecoedu:v:35:y:2013:i:c:p:24-40
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econedurev.2013.03.003
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Aparicio Fenoll, Ainhoa & Kuehn, Zoë, 2016. "Education Policies and Migration across European Countries," IZA Discussion Papers 9755, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Winters, John V., 2014. "The Production and Stock of College Graduates for U.S. States," IZA Discussion Papers 8730, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Peter McHenry, 2014. "The Geographic Distribution Of Human Capital: Measurement Of Contributing Mechanisms," Journal of Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 54(2), pages 215-248, March.
    4. Haapanen, Mika & Böckerman, Petri, 2013. "Does Higher Education Enhance Migration?," IZA Discussion Papers 7754, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Sansani, Shahar, 2015. "The differential impact of compulsory schooling laws on school quality in the United States segregated South," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 45(C), pages 64-75.
    6. repec:spr:demogr:v:54:y:2017:i:6:d:10.1007_s13524-017-0615-x is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Migration; Education; Compulsory schooling law;

    JEL classification:

    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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