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School Tracking and Mental Health

Author

Listed:
  • Böckerman, Petri

    () (Labour Institute for Economic Research)

  • Haapanen, Mika

    () (Jyväskylä University School of Business and Economics)

  • Jepsen, Christopher

    () (University College Dublin)

  • Roulet, Alexandra

    () (INSEAD)

Abstract

We examine the effects of a comprehensive school reform on mental health. The reform postponed the tracking of students into vocational and academic schools from age 11 to age 16. The reform was implemented gradually across Finnish municipalities between 1972 and 1977. We use difference-in-differences variation and administrative data. Our results show that there is no discernible effect on mental health related hospitalizations on average even though the effect is precisely estimated. Heterogeneity analysis shows that, after the reform, females from highly-educated families were more likely to be hospitalized for depression.

Suggested Citation

  • Böckerman, Petri & Haapanen, Mika & Jepsen, Christopher & Roulet, Alexandra, 2019. "School Tracking and Mental Health," IZA Discussion Papers 12733, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12733
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    tracking age; comprehensive school; mental health; depression; hospitalization;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I12 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - Health Behavior
    • I26 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Returns to Education
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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