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Did the Arab Spring Reduce MENA Countries' Growth?

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  • Arayssi, Mahmoud

    (Lebanese American University)

  • Fakih, Ali

    (Lebanese American University)

  • Haimoun, Nathir

    (University of Lethbridge)

Abstract

This paper examines the economic ramifications of the recent political reconfigurations that the MENA region witnessed, commonly known as the Arab Spring, utilizing MENA countries data during period 2005-2016. Using the Arellano-Bond dynamic panel estimation, the paper estimates a growth model using the difference in the log of GDPC between periods t and t+1. Buttressed by sufficient empirical evidence, the paper's findings corroborate that the Arab Spring had been negatively associated with growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Arayssi, Mahmoud & Fakih, Ali & Haimoun, Nathir, 2019. "Did the Arab Spring Reduce MENA Countries' Growth?," IZA Discussion Papers 12161, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp12161
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    3. Voxi Heinrich Amavilah & Antonio Rodriguez Andres, 2022. "Knowledge Economy and the Economic Performance of African Countries: A Seemingly Unrelated and Recursive Approach," Working Papers 57, The German University in Cairo, Faculty of Management Technology.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Arab Spring; growth; MENA countries; panel data;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies
    • N25 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Asia including Middle East

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