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Did the Arab Spring reduce MENA countries’ growth?

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  • Mahmoud Arayssi
  • Ali Fakih
  • Nathir Haimoun

Abstract

This paper examines the economic ramifications of the recent political reconfigurations that the MENA region witnessed, commonly known as the Arab Spring, utilizing MENA countries’ data for the period 2005–2016. Using the Arellano-Bond dynamic panel estimation, the paper estimates a growth model using the difference in the log of GDPC between periods t and t + 1. Buttressed by sufficient empirical evidence, the paper’s findings corroborate that the Arab Spring had been negatively associated with growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Mahmoud Arayssi & Ali Fakih & Nathir Haimoun, 2019. "Did the Arab Spring reduce MENA countries’ growth?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 26(19), pages 1579-1585, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:26:y:2019:i:19:p:1579-1585
    DOI: 10.1080/13504851.2019.1588938
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • G2 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services
    • O16 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Financial Markets; Saving and Capital Investment; Corporate Finance and Governance
    • P48 - Economic Systems - - Other Economic Systems - - - Political Economy; Legal Institutions; Property Rights; Natural Resources; Energy; Environment; Regional Studies
    • N25 - Economic History - - Financial Markets and Institutions - - - Asia including Middle East

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