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Class Rank and Long-Run Outcomes

Author

Listed:
  • Denning, Jeffrey T.

    () (Brigham Young University)

  • Murphy, Richard J.

    () (University of Texas at Austin)

  • Weinhardt, Felix

    () (DIW Berlin)

Abstract

This paper considers a fundamental question about the school environment – what are the long run effects of a student's ordinal rank in elementary school? Using administrative data from all public school students in Texas, we show that students with a higher third grade academic rank, conditional on ability and classroom effects, have higher subsequent test scores, are more likely to take AP classes, graduate high school, enroll in college, and ultimately have higher earnings 19 years later. Given these findings, the paper concludes by exploring the tradeoff between higher quality schools and higher rank.

Suggested Citation

  • Denning, Jeffrey T. & Murphy, Richard J. & Weinhardt, Felix, 2018. "Class Rank and Long-Run Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 11808, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11808
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    28. repec:hrv:faseco:30367426 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Benjamin Elsner & Ingo E. Isphording & Ulf Zölitz, 2018. "Achievement rank affects performance and major choices in college," ECON - Working Papers 300, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    rank; education; subject choice;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I23 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Higher Education; Research Institutions
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy

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