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The Long-Run Effects of Disruptive Peers

Author

Listed:
  • Scott E. Carrell

    () (University of California, Davis)

  • Mark Hoekstra

    () (Texas A&M University)

  • Elira Kuka

    () (Southern Methodist University)

Abstract

A large and growing literature has documented the importance of peer effects in education. However, there is relatively little evidence on the long-run educational and labor market consequences of childhood peers. We examine this question by linking administrative data on elementary school students to subsequent test scores, college attendance and completion, and earnings. To distinguish the effect of peers from confounding factors, we exploit the population variation in the proportion of children from families linked to domestic violence, who have been shown to disrupt contemporaneous behavior and learning. Results show that exposure to a disruptive peer in classes of 25 during elementary school reduces earnings at age 24 to 28 by 3 percent. We estimate that differential exposure to children linked to domestic violence explains 5 percent of the rich-poor earnings gap in our data, and that each year of exposure to a disruptive peer reduces the present discounted value of classmates’ future earnings by $80,000

Suggested Citation

  • Scott E. Carrell & Mark Hoekstra & Elira Kuka, 2018. "The Long-Run Effects of Disruptive Peers," Departmental Working Papers 1804, Southern Methodist University, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:smu:ecowpa:1804
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Raj Chetty & John N. Friedman & Nathaniel Hilger & Emmanuel Saez & Diane Whitmore Schanzenbach & Danny Yagan, 2011. "How Does Your Kindergarten Classroom Affect Your Earnings? Evidence from Project Star," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 126(4), pages 1593-1660.
    2. Scott E. Carrell & Mark Hoekstra, 2012. "Family Business or Social Problem? The Cost of Unreported Domestic Violence," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 31(4), pages 861-875, September.
    3. Caroline M. Hoxby, 2000. "The Effects of Class Size on Student Achievement: New Evidence from Population Variation," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 115(4), pages 1239-1285.
    4. Jens Ludwig & Douglas L. Miller, 2007. "Does Head Start Improve Children's Life Chances? Evidence from a Regression Discontinuity Design," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 122(1), pages 159-208.
    5. Scott E. Carrell & Mark L. Hoekstra, 2010. "Externalities in the Classroom: How Children Exposed to Domestic Violence Affect Everyone's Kids," American Economic Journal: Applied Economics, American Economic Association, vol. 2(1), pages 211-228, January.
    6. Krueger, Alan B & Whitmore, Diane M, 2001. "The Effect of Attending a Small Class in the Early Grades on College-Test Taking and Middle School Test Results: Evidence from Project STAR," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 111(468), pages 1-28, January.
    7. Massimo Anelli & Giovanni Peri, 2015. "Peers’ Composition Effects in the Short and in the Long Run: College Major, College Performance and Income," Working Papers 078, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
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    Cited by:

    1. Matthew P. Steinberg & Johanna Lacoe, "undated". "What Do We Know About School Discipline Reform?," Mathematica Policy Research Reports bb8f344e86e04bbf83582db66, Mathematica Policy Research.
    2. Maria Micaela Sviatschi, 2018. "Making a Narco: Childhood Exposure to Illegal Labor Markets and Criminal Life Paths," Working Papers 2018-03, Princeton University, Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs, Research Program in Development Studies..
    3. Bart H.H. Golsteyn & Arjan Non & Ulf Zölitz, 2017. "The impact of peer personality on academic achievement," ECON - Working Papers 269, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    4. Bryan Stuart, 2017. "The Long-Run Effects of Recessions on Education and Income," Working Papers 2017-25, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.
    5. Ahn, Tom & Trogdon, Justin G., 2017. "Peer delinquency and student achievement in middle school," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 192-217.
    6. Sanni N. Breining & Joseph J. Doyle, Jr. & David N. Figlio & Krzysztof Karbownik & Jeffrey Roth, 2017. "Birth Order and Delinquency: Evidence from Denmark and Florida," NBER Working Papers 23038, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    7. Merlino, Luca Paolo & Steinhardt, Max F. & Wren-Lewis, Liam, 2016. "More than Just Friends? School Peers and Adult Interracial Relationships," IZA Discussion Papers 10319, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Anne Ardila Brenøe & Ulf Zölitz, 2018. "Exposure to more female peers widens the gender gap in STEM participation," ECON - Working Papers 285, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    9. Anelli, Massimo & Shih, Kevin Y. & Williams, Kevin, 2017. "Foreign Peer Effects and STEM Major Choice," IZA Discussion Papers 10743, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    10. Lovén, Ida, 2017. "Labor market consequences of growing up with a sibling with type 1-diabetes," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 178(C), pages 1-10.
    11. Richard J. Murnane & Marcus R. Waldman & John B. Willett & Maria Soledad Bos & Emiliana Vegas, 2017. "The Consequences of Educational Voucher Reform in Chile," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 8491, Inter-American Development Bank.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Peer Effects; Domestic Violence;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General

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