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Student Work, Educational Achievement, and Later Employment: A Dynamic Approach

Author

Listed:
  • Baert, Stijn

    () (Ghent University)

  • Neyt, Brecht

    () (Ghent University)

  • Omey, Eddy

    () (Ghent University)

  • Verhaest, Dieter

    () (KU Leuven)

Abstract

This study examines the direct and indirect impact (via educational achievement) of student work during secondary education on later employment outcomes. To this end, we jointly model student work and later schooling and employment outcomes as a chain of discrete choices. To tackle their endogeneity, we correct for these outcomes' unobserved determinants. Using unique longitudinal Belgian data, we find that pupils who work during the summer holidays of secondary education are 15.3% more likely to have a job three months after leaving school. This premium to student work experience is higher when pupils also work during the academic year and diminishes for later employment outcomes. When decomposing this total effect, it turns out that the direct returns to student work overcompensate its non-positive indirect effect via tertiary education enrolment.

Suggested Citation

  • Baert, Stijn & Neyt, Brecht & Omey, Eddy & Verhaest, Dieter, 2017. "Student Work, Educational Achievement, and Later Employment: A Dynamic Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 11127, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp11127
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    File URL: http://ftp.iza.org/dp11127.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Baert, Stijn & Heiland, Frank & Korenman, Sanders, 2014. "Native-Immigrant Gaps in Educational and School-to-Work Transitions in the Second Generation: The Role of Gender and Ethnicity," IZA Discussion Papers 8752, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Baert, Stijn & Cockx, Bart, 2013. "Pure ethnic gaps in educational attainment and school to work transitions: When do they arise?," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 276-294.
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    4. Regula Geel & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2012. "Earning While Learning: When and How Student Employment is Beneficial," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 26(3), pages 313-340, September.
    5. Belzil, Christian & Poinas, François, 2010. "Education and early career outcomes of second-generation immigrants in France," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(1), pages 101-110, January.
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    13. Stijn Baert & Olivier Rotsaert & Dieter Verhaest & Eddy Omey, 2016. "Student Employment and Later Labour Market Success: No Evidence for Higher Employment Chances," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(3), pages 401-425, August.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Neyt, Brecht & Verhaest, Dieter & Baert, Stijn, 2018. "The Impact of Dual Apprenticeship Programs on Early Labour Market Outcomes: A Dynamic Approach," IZA Discussion Papers 12011, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. repec:bla:jecsur:v:33:y:2019:i:3:p:896-921 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Brecht Neyt & Eddy Omey & Dieter Verhaest & Stijn Baert, 2019. "Does Student Work Really Affect Educational Outcomes? A Review Of The Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 33(3), pages 896-921, July.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; transitions in youth; student employment; labour; dynamic treatment;

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • C35 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Multiple or Simultaneous Equation Models; Multiple Variables - - - Discrete Regression and Qualitative Choice Models; Discrete Regressors; Proportions

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