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I (Don't) Like You! But Who Cares? Gender Differences in Same Sex and Mixed Sex Teams

Author

Listed:
  • Gerhards, Leonie

    () (University of Hamburg)

  • Kosfeld, Michael

    () (Goethe University Frankfurt)

Abstract

We study the effect of likability on female and male team behavior in a lab experiment. Extending a two-player public goods game and a minimum effort game by an additional pre-play stage that informs team members about their mutual likability we find that female teams lower their contribution to the public good in case of low likability, while male teams achieve high levels of cooperation irrespective of the level of mutual likability. In mixed sex teams, both females' and males' contributions depend on mutual likability. Similar results are found in the minimum effort game. Our results offer a new perspective on gender differences in labor market outcomes: mutual dislikability impedes team behavior, except in all-male teams.

Suggested Citation

  • Gerhards, Leonie & Kosfeld, Michael, 2017. "I (Don't) Like You! But Who Cares? Gender Differences in Same Sex and Mixed Sex Teams," IZA Discussion Papers 10825, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10825
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    experiment; likability; gender differences; team behavior;

    JEL classification:

    • C90 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Design of Experiments - - - General
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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