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Earnings among Nine Ethnic Minorities and the Han Majority in China's Cities

Author

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  • Gustafsson, Björn Anders

    (University of Gothenburg)

  • Yang, Xiuna

    (China Development Research Foundation)

Abstract

This paper asks if economic growth and steps towards a market economy have affected earnings gaps between the Han and nine large urban ethnic minorities: Zhuang, Hui, Manchurian, Tujia, Uighur, Miao, Tibetan, Mongol and Korean. It also asks how earnings premiums and earnings penalties have changed for the nine ethnic minorities. For the analysis we use a subsample of the 2005 China's Inter-Census Survey. We find examples of three different changes over time in earnings premiums and earnings penalties: One ethnic minority for whom the development has been more favourable than for the Han majority; a second category in which development has been similar; and a third category for which development has been unfavourable. We conclude from the analysis that it can be misleading to infer the experience of one ethnic minority from that of another.

Suggested Citation

  • Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Yang, Xiuna, 2016. "Earnings among Nine Ethnic Minorities and the Han Majority in China's Cities," IZA Discussion Papers 10230, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp10230
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James W. Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2010. "A comparison and decomposition of reform-era labor force participation rates of China's ethnic minorities and Han majority," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 138-162, May.
    2. Reza Hasmath, 2008. "The big payoff? Educational and occupational attainments of ethnic minorities in Beijing," The European Journal of Development Research, Taylor and Francis Journals, vol. 20(1), pages 104-116.
    3. Christopher F Baum, 2006. "An Introduction to Modern Econometrics using Stata," Stata Press books, StataCorp LP, number imeus, August.
    4. Margaret Maurer-Fazio, 2012. "Ethnic discrimination in China's internet job board labor market," IZA Journal of Migration and Development, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 1(1), pages 1-24, December.
    5. Li Shi & Ding Sai, 2013. "An Empirical Analysis of Income Inequality between a Minority and the Majority in Urban China: The Case of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 40(3), pages 341-355, September.
    6. Zang, Xiaowei, 2008. "Market Reforms and Han-Muslim Variation in Employment in the Chinese State Sector in a Chinese City," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 36(11), pages 2341-2352, November.
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    1. Earnings among Nine Ethnic Minorities and the Han Majority in China’s Cities
      by maximorossi in NEP-LTV blog on 2016-10-19 19:27:14

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    earnings; ethnic minorities; Uighur; Tibetan; Korean;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • P23 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Factor and Product Markets; Industry Studies; Population

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