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Ethnic Discrimination in China's Internet Job Board Labor Market

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  • Maurer-Fazio, Margaret

    () (Bates College)

Abstract

We conduct a large‐scale field experiment to investigate how Chinese firms respond to job applications from ethnic minority and Han applicants for jobs posted on a large Chinese Internet job board. We denote ethnicity by means of names that are typically Han Chinese and distinctively Mongolian, Tibetan, and Uighur. We find significant differences in the callback rates by ethnicity and that these differences vary systematically across ethnic groups. Not all firms discriminate – approximately half treat all candidates equally. State-owned firms are significantly less likely than privately‐owned firms to discriminate against minorities by calling only candidates with Han names and much more likely to treat candidates equally.

Suggested Citation

  • Maurer-Fazio, Margaret, 2012. "Ethnic Discrimination in China's Internet Job Board Labor Market," IZA Discussion Papers 6903, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp6903
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Peter Kuhn & Kailing Shen, 2009. "Employers' Preferences for Gender, Age, Height and Beauty: Direct Evidence," NBER Working Papers 15564, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
    3. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James W. Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2010. "A comparison and decomposition of reform-era labor force participation rates of China's ethnic minorities and Han majority," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 138-162, May.
    4. Emily Hannum & Yu Xie, 1998. "Ethnic stratification in Northwest China: Occupational differences between Han Chinese and national minorities in Xinjiang, 1982–1990," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 35(3), pages 323-333, August.
    5. Leo Kaas & Christian Manger, 2012. "Ethnic Discrimination in Germany's Labour Market: A Field Experiment," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 13(1), pages 1-20, February.
    6. Siddique, Zahra, 2008. "Caste Based Discrimination: Evidence and Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 3737, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2007. "An Ocean formed from one hundred rivers: the effects of ethnicity, gender, marriage, and location on labor force participation in urban China," Feminist Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3-4), pages 159-187.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Asali, Muhammad & Pignatti, Norberto & Skhirtladze, Sophiko, 2017. "Employment Discrimination in a Former Soviet Union Republic: Evidence from a Field Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 11056, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Sai, Ding, 2014. "Why Is There No Income Gap Between the Hui Muslim Minority and the Han Majority in Rural Ningxia, China?," IZA Discussion Papers 7970, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Baert, Stijn, 2017. "Hiring Discrimination: An Overview of (Almost) All Correspondence Experiments Since 2005," IZA Discussion Papers 10738, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Mobius, Markus & Rosenblat, Tanya & Wang, Qiqi, 2016. "Ethnic discrimination: Evidence from China," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 90(C), pages 165-177.
    5. Marianne Bertrand & Esther Duflo, 2016. "Field Experiments on Discrimination," NBER Working Papers 22014, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Yang, Xiuna, 2016. "Earnings among Nine Ethnic Minorities and the Han Majority in China's Cities," IZA Discussion Papers 10230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Yang, Xiuna, 2015. "Are China's Ethnic Minorities Less Likely to Move?," IZA Discussion Papers 9018, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    8. Fischer, A.M. & Zenz, A., 2016. "The evolution of Tibetan representation and preferentiality in public employment during the Post-fenpei period in China: Insights from new data sources," ISS Working Papers - General Series 620, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
    9. Han, Enze & Paik, Christopher, 2017. "Ethnic Integration and Development in China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 93(C), pages 31-42.
    10. Lucia Kureková & Miroslav Beblavý & Anna Thum-Thysen, 2015. "Using online vacancies and web surveys to analyse the labour market: a methodological inquiry," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-20, December.
    11. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & Lei Lei, 2015. "“As rare as a panda”: How facial attractiveness, gender, and occupation affect interview callbacks at Chinese firms," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 36(1), pages 68-85, April.
    12. Rich, Judy, 2014. "What Do Field Experiments of Discrimination in Markets Tell Us? A Meta Analysis of Studies Conducted since 2000," IZA Discussion Papers 8584, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. Maurer-Fazio, Margaret & Connelly, Rachel & Thi Tran, Ngoc-Han, 2015. "Do Negative Native-Place Stereotypes Lead to Discriminatory Wage Penalties in China's Migrant Labor Markets?," IZA Discussion Papers 8842, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    resume audit study; internet job boards; Chinese firms; hiring; discrimination; ethnicity;

    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J23 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Demand
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • O52 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Europe
    • P25 - Economic Systems - - Socialist Systems and Transition Economies - - - Urban, Rural, and Regional Economics

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