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An Empirical Analysis of Income Inequality between a Minority and the Majority in Urban China: The Case of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region

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  • Li Shi
  • Ding Sai

Abstract

Based on the urban survey data of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region in 2006, this paper studies the impact of ethnic characteristics on the income determination mechanism in the same economic region. Using the decomposition methods of Blinder and Oaxaca, Fields, and Morduch and Sicular, we analyze income gap between employed Hui and Han as well as income inequality within the two ethnic groups. The main conclusions are, first, that there is almost no income gap between Han and Hui in Ningxia. But different ethnic characteristics have effects on the income determination mechanism. Ethnic factors such as religion and social capital have no obvious effect on the income determination.

Suggested Citation

  • Li Shi & Ding Sai, 2009. "An Empirical Analysis of Income Inequality between a Minority and the Majority in Urban China: The Case of Ningxia Hui Autonomous Region," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd08-022, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  • Handle: RePEc:hst:ghsdps:gd08-022
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Gustafsson, Bjorn & Shi, Li, 2003. "The Ethnic Minority-Majority Income Gap in Rural China during Transition," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 51(4), pages 805-822, July.
    2. William A. Darity Jr. & Samuel L. Myers Jr. & Chanjin Chung, 1998. "Racial Earnings Disparities and Family Structure," Southern Economic Journal, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 65(1), pages 20-41, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Margaret Maurer-Fazio & James W. Hughes & Dandan Zhang, 2010. "A comparison and decomposition of reform-era labor force participation rates of China's ethnic minorities and Han majority," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 31(2), pages 138-162, May.
    2. Björn Gustafsson & Xiuna Yang, 2017. "Earnings among nine ethnic minorities and the Han majority in China's cities," Journal of the Asia Pacific Economy, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 22(3), pages 525-546, July.
    3. Gustafsson, Björn Anders & Yang, Xiuna, 2016. "Earnings among Nine Ethnic Minorities and the Han Majority in China's Cities," IZA Discussion Papers 10230, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Anthony Howell, 2019. "Ethnic entrepreneurship, initial financing, and business performance in China," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 52(3), pages 697-712, March.
    5. Qidong Huang & Jiajun Xu & Yongping Wei, 2018. "Clan in Transition: Societal Changes of Villages in China from the Perspective of Water Pollution," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(1), pages 1-12, January.
    6. Björn Gustafsson & Ding Sai, 2015. "Mapping and Understanding Ethnic Disparities in Length of Schooling: The Case of the Hui Minority and the Han Majority in Ningxia Autonomous Region, China," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 124(2), pages 517-535, November.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Minority; Majority; Income Inequality;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • D33 - Microeconomics - - Distribution - - - Factor Income Distribution
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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