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Economic returns to schooling for China's Korean minority

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  • Mishra, Vinod
  • Smyth, Russell

Abstract

This paper examines economic returns to schooling for China's Korean minority in the urban labour market using ordinary least squares (OLS) and two-stage least squares. The OLS estimates of the returns to schooling are similar to findings from recent studies for the Chinese urban labour market. We use parents’ education and spouse's education to instrument for education as well as exploit heteroskedasticity to aid in identification. The two-stage least squares estimates using parents’ and spouse's education are considerably higher than the OLS estimates for returns to schooling, while the estimates which exploit heteroskedasticity for identification lie between the OLS and conventional two-stage least squares estimates. The economic returns to schooling reported in this study assist in explaining why private demand for education is strong among the ethnic Koreans in China. It also provides a justification for the Korean minority's focus on educational attainment.

Suggested Citation

  • Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2013. "Economic returns to schooling for China's Korean minority," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 89-102.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:asieco:v:24:y:2013:i:c:p:89-102
    DOI: 10.1016/j.asieco.2012.09.001
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    Cited by:

    1. Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2015. "Estimating returns to schooling in urban China using conventional and heteroskedasticity-based instruments," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 166-173.
    2. Guo, Qian & Sun, Wenkai, 2014. "Economic returns to English proficiency for college graduates in mainland China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 290-300.
    3. Wenshu Gao & Russell Smyth, 2012. "Returns to Schooling in Urban China, 2001-2010: Evidence from Three Waves of the China Urban Labor Survey," Monash Economics Working Papers 50-12, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    4. Kolstad, Ivar & Wiig, Arne & Moazzem, Khondaker Golam, 2014. "Returns to education among entrepreneurs in Bangladesh," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 54-65.
    5. repec:jfr:ijfr11:v:8:y:2017:i:3:p:85-104 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Sefa Awaworyi & Vinod Mishra, 2014. "Returns to Education in China: A Meta-analysis," Monash Economics Working Papers 41-14, Monash University, Department of Economics.
    7. Castro Campos, Bente & Ren, Yanjun & Petrick, Martin, 2016. "The impact of education on income inequality between ethnic minorities and Han in China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 253-267.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Koreans; China; Education; Minority; Income;

    JEL classification:

    • I2 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education
    • J3 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs

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