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Temporary And Persistent Poverty Among Ethnic Minorities And The Majority In Rural China


  • Björn Gustafsson
  • Ding Sai


Poverty among ethnic minorities and the majority in rural China for the years 2000, 2001 and 2002 is investigated, taking a dynamic view and using a large sample covering 22 provinces. Based on the National Bureau of Statistics' low income line, almost one-third of the ethnic minorities experienced poverty during the three years studied while the corresponding proportion among the ethnic majority was only about half as high. Still, by far most of the poor in rural China belong to the ethnic majority. The relatively high poverty rates for ethnic minorities in rural China are found to be due to higher rates of entry than for the majority, while differences in exit rates across ethnicities are few. To a large extent, ethnic poverty differences can be attributed to differences in location, together with temporary and persistent poverty in rural China having a very clear spatial character. Poverty is concentrated in the western region and villages with low average income. Determinants of persistent and temporary poverty in rural China differ due to location as well as household characteristics. Copyright 2009 The Authors. Journal compilation International Association for Research in Income and Wealth 2009.

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  • Björn Gustafsson & Ding Sai, 2009. "Temporary And Persistent Poverty Among Ethnic Minorities And The Majority In Rural China," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 55(s1), pages 588-606, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:revinw:v:55:y:2009:i:s1:p:588-606

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    Cited by:

    1. Bui, Tuan & Nguyen, Cuong & Pham, Phuong, 2015. "Poverty among ethnic minorities: transition process, inequality and economic growth," MPRA Paper 68924, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Katsushi S. Imai & Jing You, 2011. "Poverty Dynamics of Households in Rural China: Identifying Multiple Pathways for Poverty Transition," Discussion Paper Series DP2011-35, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
    3. Awaworyi Churchill, Sefa & Smyth, Russell, 2017. "Ethnic Diversity and Poverty," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 95(C), pages 285-302.
    4. Glauben, Thomas & Herzfeld, Thomas & Rozelle, Scott & Wang, Xiaobing, 2012. "Persistent Poverty in Rural China: Where, Why, and How to Escape?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(4), pages 784-795.
    5. Vinod Mishra & Ingrid Nielsen & Russell Smyth, 2014. "How Does Relative Income and Variations in Short-Run Wellbeing Affect Wellbeing in the Long Run? Empirical Evidence From China’s Korean Minority," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 115(1), pages 67-91, January.
    6. Yaojun Li & Yizhang Zhao, 2017. "Double Disadvantages: A Study of Ethnic and Hukou Effects on Class Mobility in China (1996–2014)," Social Inclusion, Cogitatio Press, vol. 5(1), pages 5-19.
    7. Katsushi S. Imai & Jing You, 2014. "Poverty Dynamics of Households in Rural China," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 76(6), pages 898-923, December.
    8. Yishen Liu & Yao Pan, 2016. "Less restrictive birth control, less education? Evidence from ethnic minorities in China," WIDER Working Paper Series 077, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
    9. Garza-Rodriguez, Jorge, 2016. "The determinants of poverty in the Mexican states of the US-Mexico border," MPRA Paper 71523, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Zhang, Yumei & Filipski, Mateusz & Chen, Kevin Z. & Diao, Xinshen, 2015. "Who is Poor this Year? Understanding Fluctuations in Poverty Status in Three Chinese Villages," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212604, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    11. Howell, Anthony, 2017. "Impacts of Migration and Remittances on Ethnic Income Inequality in Rural China," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 94(C), pages 200-211.
    12. Garza-Rodriguez, Jorge, 2016. "Los determinantes de la pobreza en los estados mexicanos en la frontera con Estados Unidos
      [The determinants of poverty in the Mexican states of the US–Mexico border]
      ," MPRA Paper 71526, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Mishra, Vinod & Smyth, Russell, 2013. "Economic returns to schooling for China's Korean minority," Journal of Asian Economics, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 89-102.
    14. Zhang, Yumei & Filipski, Mateusz & Chen, Kevin & Diao, Xinshen, 2014. "Poverty Exit and Entry in Poor Villages in China," 2014 Annual Meeting, July 27-29, 2014, Minneapolis, Minnesota 173100, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.

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