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The structure of hiring costs in Germany - evidence from firm-level data

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  • Samuel Muehlemann

    (Department of Economics, University of Bern, Switzerland; IRLE, University of California, Berkeley, USA; IZA, Bonn, Germany)

  • Harald Pfeifer

    (Federal Institute for Vocational Education and Training, Bonn, Germany; ROA, Maastricht University, The Netherlands)

Abstract

This paper analyzes the structure of hiring costs of skilled workers in Germany. Using detailed and representative firm-level data on recruitment and adaptation costs of new hires, we find that average hiring costs amount to more than 8 weeks of wage payments (4,700 Euros). The structure of hiring costs is convex, as an increase in the number of hires by 1% increases hiring costs by 1.3%. We find moderate effects of labor market institutions on the magnitude but none on the structure of hiring costs. Furthermore, we provide evidence in favor of monopsony power in the German labor market.

Suggested Citation

  • Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer, 2012. "The structure of hiring costs in Germany - evidence from firm-level data," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0077, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Sep 2013.
  • Handle: RePEc:iso:educat:0077
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    1. The cost of hiring in Germany
      by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2012-05-01 19:41:00

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    Cited by:

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    2. Krebs, Tom & Scheffel, Martin, 2016. "Labor Market Institutions and the Cost of Recessions," IZA Discussion Papers 10442, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    3. Carbonero, Francesco & Gartner, Hermann, 2017. "Inspecting the relation of search cost and search duration for new hires," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 21/2017, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    4. Bellmann, Lisa & Brixy, Udo, 2018. "Hiring by start-ups and regional labor supply," IAB-Discussion Paper 201818, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    5. Simona E. Cociuba & James C. MacGee, 2018. "Demographics and Sectoral Reallocations: A Search Theory with Immobile Workers," UWO Department of Economics Working Papers 20182, University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics.
    6. Axtell, Robert L. & Guerrero, Omar A. & López, Eduardo, 2019. "Frictional unemployment on labor flow networks," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 160(C), pages 184-201.
    7. Agnese, Pablo & Hromcová, Jana, 2016. "Low-skill offshoring and welfare compensation policies," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 52(PB), pages 408-426.
    8. Bachmann, Rüdiger & Bayer, Christian & Merkl, Christian & Seth, Stefan & Stüber, Heiko & Wellschmied, Felix, 2017. "Worker Churn and Employment Growth at the Establishment Level," IZA Discussion Papers 11063, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    9. Stefano Banfi & Benjamín Villena-Roldán, 2019. "Do High-Wage Jobs Attract More Applicants? Directed Search Evidence from the Online Labor Market," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 37(3), pages 715-746.
    10. Harald Pfeifer & Uschi Backes-Gellner, 2017. "Another piece of the puzzle: Firms' investment in training as optimization of skills inventory," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0136, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW), revised Jun 2018.
    11. Francesco Carbonero & Christian Offermanns & Enzo Weber, 2017. "The Trend in Labour Income Share: the Role of Technological Change and Imperfect Labour Markets," Working Papers 173, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    12. Bachmann, Rüdiger & Bayer, Christian & Merkl, Christian & Seth, Stefan & Stüber, Heiko & Wellschmied, Felix, 2021. "Worker churn in the cross section and over time: New evidence from Germany," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 117(C), pages 781-797.
    13. Yaman, F., 2016. "Structural Estimation of Labor Adjustment Costs," Working Papers 15/22, Department of Economics, City University London.
    14. Aziza Garsaa & Nadine Levratto, 2015. "Do labor tax rebates facilitate firm growth? An empirical study on French establishments in the manufacturing industry, 2004–2011," Small Business Economics, Springer, vol. 45(3), pages 613-641, October.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labor adjustment costs; hiring costs; search costs; adaptation costs;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • J32 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Nonwage Labor Costs and Benefits; Retirement Plans; Private Pensions
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs

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