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A Note on Job Tenure and Collective Contracts

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  • Knut Gerlach
  • Gesine Stephan

Abstract

This paper analyses the relationship between individual tenure and the application of collective contracts at the firm level under the specific institutional settings in Germany. The empirical approach is based on a multilevel model and a linked employer-employee data set for the years 1990, 1995, and 2001. The main result is that elapsed tenure is longer in firms applying collective contracts than in companies with individual wage setting: workers in firms with collective contracts benefit not only from higher wages, but also from higher job stability. Furthermore, we find no significant changes in mean tenure during the 1990s as well as stable differences across wage-setting regimes. Copyright 2008 The Authors.

Suggested Citation

  • Knut Gerlach & Gesine Stephan, 2008. "A Note on Job Tenure and Collective Contracts," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 22(1), pages 167-183, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:labour:v:22:y:2008:i:1:p:167-183
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bergemann, Annette & Mertens, Antje, 2004. "Job Stability Trends, Layoffs, and Transitions to Unemployment: An Empirical Analysis for West Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 1368, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. David I. Levine & Dale Belman & Gary Charness & Erica L. Groshen & K.C. O'Shaughnessy, 2002. "How New is the "New Employment Contract"? Evidence from North American Pay Practices," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number nec, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer, 2016. "The Structure of Hiring Costs in Germany: Evidence from Firm-Level Data," Industrial Relations: A Journal of Economy and Society, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 55(2), pages 193-218, April.
    2. Uwe Jirjahn, 2015. "Research on Trade Unions and Collective Bargaining in Germany: The Contribution of Labor Economics," Research Papers in Economics 2015-10, University of Trier, Department of Economics.
    3. Uwe Jirjahn, 2013. "Der Beitrag der Arbeitsmarkt├Âkonomik zur Erforschung von Gewerkschaften und Tarifvertragsbeziehungen in Deutschland," Research Papers in Economics 2013-03, University of Trier, Department of Economics.

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