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The Welfare Costs of Self-Fulfilling Bank Runs

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  • Elena Mattana
  • Ettore Panetti

Abstract

We study the welfare implications of self-fulfilling bank runs and liquidity require-ments, in a neoclassical growth model where banks, facing long-lasting possible runs, can choose in any period a run-proof asset portfolio. In this framework, runs distort banks’insurance provision against idiosyncratic liquidity shocks, and liquidity requirements re-solve this distortion by forcing a credit tightening. Quantitatively, the welfare costs of self-fulfilling bank runs are equivalent to a constant consumption loss of up to 2.5 percent of U.S. GDP. Depending on fundamentals, liquidity requirements might generate small welfare gains, but also increase the welfare costs by up to 1.8 percent.

Suggested Citation

  • Elena Mattana & Ettore Panetti, 2017. "The Welfare Costs of Self-Fulfilling Bank Runs," Working Papers REM 2017/17, ISEG - Lisbon School of Economics and Management, REM, Universidade de Lisboa.
  • Handle: RePEc:ise:remwps:wp0172017
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    File URL: https://rem.rc.iseg.ulisboa.pt/wps/pdf/REM_WP_017_2017.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Roberto Robatto, 2019. "Systemic Banking Panics, Liquidity Risk, and Monetary Policy," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 34, pages 20-42, October.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    financial intermediation; bank runs; regulation; welfare;

    JEL classification:

    • E21 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Consumption; Saving; Wealth
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • G01 - Financial Economics - - General - - - Financial Crises
    • G20 - Financial Economics - - Financial Institutions and Services - - - General

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