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Decomposing the growth in residential land in the United States

Author

Listed:
  • Henry G. Overman

    (London School of Economics)

  • Diego Puga

    (Universitat Pompeu Fabra and IMDEA)

  • Matthew A. Turner

    (University of Toronto)

Abstract

This paper decomposes the growth in land occupied by residences in the United States to give the relative contributions of changing demographics versus increases in the land area used by individual households. Between 1976 and 1992 the amount of residential land in the United States grew 47.5% while population only grew 17.8%. At first glance, this suggest an important role for per-household increases. However, the calculations in this paper show that only 24.3% of the growth in residential land area can be attributed to State-level changes in land per household. 37.5% is due to overall population growth, 5.9% to the shift of population towards States with larger houses, 22.7% to an increase in the number of households over this period, and the remaining 9.5% to interactions between these changes. There are large differences across states and metropolitan areas in the relative importance of these components.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry G. Overman & Diego Puga & Matthew A. Turner, 2007. "Decomposing the growth in residential land in the United States," Working Papers 2007-02, Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados (IMDEA) Ciencias Sociales.
  • Handle: RePEc:imd:wpaper:wp2007-02
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Denant-Boemont, Laurent & Gaigné, Carl & Gaté, Romain, 2018. "Urban spatial structure, transport-related emissions and welfare," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 29-45.
    2. Wang, Chunhua, 2013. "Differential output growth across regions and carbon dioxide emissions: Evidence from U.S. and China," Energy, Elsevier, vol. 53(C), pages 230-236.
    3. Stéphane De Cara & Anne Fournier & Carl Gaigné, 2011. "Feeding the cities and greenhouse gas emissions: a new economic geography approach," Working Papers 1109, Chaire Economie du climat.
    4. de Cara, Stephane & Fournier, Anne & Gaigne, Carl, 2011. "Feeding the Cities and Greenhouse Gas Emissions - Beyond the Food Miles Approach," 2011 International Congress, August 30-September 2, 2011, Zurich, Switzerland 114350, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Chunhua Wang, 2016. "Regional Economic Development, Energy Consumption and Carbon Emissions in China," EEPSEA Research Report rr20160338, Economy and Environment Program for Southeast Asia (EEPSEA), revised Mar 2016.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    land use; population growth;

    JEL classification:

    • R14 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Land Use Patterns
    • O51 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - U.S.; Canada

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